Giant Salamander


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Related to Giant Salamander: Cryptobranchidae, Pacific giant salamander

Giant Salamander

 

(Megalobatrachus japonicus), a tailed amphibian of the family Cryptobranchidae. Length, up to 160 cm (it is the largest living amphibian). The giant salamander has no eyelids; the soft and knobbly skin is brownish gray. The giant salamander is found in China and Japan. It inhabits mountain brooks and rivers, feeding on small fish, amphibians, and other aquatic animals. The female lays her eggs in submerged horizontal burrows, and the male guards them; the larvae are born in two months. The meat of the giant salamander is used as food. It has been nearly exterminated.

References in periodicals archive ?
Numbers of the Chinese giant salamander, whose home is central and southern China, have "declined catastrophically" over the last three decades, mostly due to over-exploitation for human consumption, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).
The IUCN says there is some commercial farming of giant salamanders, but the vast majority being traded are believed to have been poached from wild populations.
Zeng); and Tiancheng Giant Salamander Bioengineering Ltd, Hanzhong, People's Republic of China (C.
The sequences of the 3 PCR products from the virus-infected Chinese giant salamanders (GenBank accession nos.
In addition, absence of exposure of Chinese giant salamanders to other animal carriers of the virus may prevent horizontal transmission of iridovirus.
Giant salamanders, a much-prized delicacy despite being under threat of extinction, were an astonishing sight as were the cave-dwelling monkeys who begin life with fur as ginger as Chris Evans.
Here, you can get up close to precious native animals like giant pandas, red pandas, Chinese giant salamanders and Chinese alligators.
And giant salamanders -- about the length of a human's arm span -- respire underwater directly through their skin, which is also their keenest sensory organ.
Many amazing animals are exhibited including the Japanese giant salamanders (the world's largest amphibian reaching 5 ft.
These creatures reached about 3 to 5 feet in length and probably resembled giant salamanders, McKay says.