macrophage

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macrophage

[′mak·rə‚fāj]
(histology)
A large phagocyte of the reticuloendothelial system. Also known as a histiocyte.
References in periodicals archive ?
Morphologically, the tumour pattern, as seen in other subtypes, is composed of a mixture of fibroblasts, histiocytes and osteoclast-type giant cells in relatively changing amounts.
denosumab) in adults and skeletally mature adolescents diagnosed with giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB).
Biopsy specimen revealed inflammation with dense lymphoplasmocytes, histiocytes and lymphoid aggregations suggesting giant cell arteritis (Fig.
6) Although it shares morphologic features with soft tissue CCS, it may also have distinct features such as pseudoalveolar and pseudopapillary growth patterns, the presence of osteoclast-type giant cells, and less conspicuous nucleoli.
reports of temporal artery biopsies in 223 patients with TA and found that 164 (74%) of the reports mentioned the presence of giant cells.
Differential diagnosis for lesions that centered within the thyroid or crycoid cartilage includes giant cell reparative granuloma, brown tumor of hyperparathyroidism, osteoblastoma, chondroblastoma, chondrosarcoma, chondroma, aneurysmal bone cyst, nonossifying fibroma, foreign body reaction, benign fibrous histiocytoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, osteosarcoma with abundant giant cells, and carcinoma (including spindle cell or sarcomatoid carcinoma) with giant cells.
Post-operative histopathological diagnosis confirmed a lesion composed of numerous anastomosing bony trabeculae between which were islands of fibrous tissue with giant cells and osteoid formation.
Large-vessel vasculitides, for instance giant cell arteritis, Takayasu arteritis, Behcet's syndrome, and Cogan's syndrome along with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and relapsing polychondritis may present with noninfectious aortitis.
Giant cell arteritis (GCA), the most common of the vasculitides, has an incidence of 7-29/100,000 people aged 50 and older in Europe, notably among women.
The presence of giant cells has been suggested as partially contributing to the high uptake of FDG in benign bone lesions such as brown tumours.
1,3) Metastasis, highly severe necrosis, local recurrence, atypical giant cell, surgical phase, number of cells, and presence of 3 or more mitoses are important in the prognosis.