Gibeonites


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Gibeonites

consigned to servitude in retribution for trickery. [O.T.: Joshua 9:22–27]

Gibeonites

obtained treaty with Joshua under false pretenses. [O.T.: Joshua 9:3–15]
References in periodicals archive ?
The fictitious painting depicts David avenging the Gibeonites.
Hivai, a Gibeonite who once successfully foretold the future, now appears to have lost his prophetic skill.
What Hareven undoubtedly noticed about these transformations is that they seem to undermine or blur the boundaries articulated by the Deuteronomic code: the stories of Rahab and the Gibeonites argue for flexibility in the determination of Israel's internal boundaries.
She was the concubine of Saul, and it is two of her sons who are killed by the Gibeonites.
20:5), the execution of Saul's descendents as expiation for the blood of the Gibeonites (II Sam.
Another case of Gentiles joining the covenant community involves the Gibeonites, who succeeded in doing so only through trickery (Josh.
When David killed seven of Saul's descendants to appease the Gibeonites, he spared Mephibosheth because of this oath: The king spared Mephibosheth son of Jonathan son of Saul, because of the oath before the Lord between the two, between David and Jonathan son of Saul (II Sam.
That Ruth's progeny after a few generations happened to be David is clearly incidental, and, entre nous, nothing to make Ruth and No'omi proud of, in view of David's crimes against Uriah the Hittite (another virtuous stranger), the king having committed adultery and murder (two capital offences according to the Torah), besides getting rid of the descendants of Saul--not personally, but accommodating the Gibeonites (See 2 Samuel, 21:1-9).
According to Yahweh, Saul's people had done wrong by a massacre of the Gibeonites, whom Israel had sworn to spare.
More impressively, a nation that persistently complained throughout Moses' 40 years of leadership grumbled only once in the Book of Joshua--to the elders (and not to Joshua) after they mistakenly struck a treaty with the Gibeonites (9:18).
This "coda" is a reflection on 2 Samuel 21, (22) in which the Gibeonites demand the death of Saul's sons, and David complies--a frightening example of a situation in which perfect justice is not possible.
He turned over two sons and five grandsons of King Saul to the Gibeonites, to hang then in vengeance for their grievances against Saul (II Samuel 21).