bit rate

(redirected from Gigabytes per second)
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Related to Gigabytes per second: Gigabits per second, Megabytes per second

bit rate

[′bit ‚rāt]
(communications)
Quantity, per unit time, of binary digits (or pulses representing them) which will pass a given point on a communications line or channel in a continuous stream.

bit rate

(communications, digital signal processing)
(Or "bitrate") A data rate expressed in bits per second. This is a similar to baud but the latter is more applicable to channels with more than two states.

The common units of bit rate are kilobits per second (Kbps) and megabits per second (Mbps). In data rates, the multipliers "k", "M", etc. stand for powers of 1000 not powers of 1024.

The term is also commonly used when discussing digital sampling and sample rates. For example, the MP3 audio compaction algorithm is often set to ouput files with a bitrate of 120 kbps. This means that the file contains an average of 120 kilobits for each second of audio (900 KB per minute). This compares with CD audio which is encoded at 44100 16-bit stereo samples per second or 1408 kbps.

bit rate

(1) See data rate.

(2) The speed that digital audio and video files are encoded (compressed), measured in kilobits (Kb) and megabits (Mb) per second. For example, MP3 audio files can be created with bit rates from 16 Kbps to 320 Kbps, with 128 Kbps being fairly common. Video formats also run the gamut, from as little as 10 Mbps for preview frames to 400 Mbps and higher for HD.

The higher the bit rate, the less compression and the better the audio or video quality. It is sometimes extremely difficult to hear or see the difference unless comparing content with bit rates that are far apart. See space/time.
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Rackable Systems' Parallel File System Solution, which won Best Utility/Grid Solution, presents Linux/Unix clients with a single network file system that can be scaled to gigabytes per second of throughput and petabytes of capacity.
6 GigaBytes per second, 12 times faster than DDR400 memory and 6 times faster than leading RDRAM(R) (PC 800) devices.