gigawatt

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gigawatt

[′gig·ə‚wät]
(electricity)
One billion watts, or 109 watts. Abbreviated GW.
References in periodicals archive ?
Germany, which led the world in the total amount of solar gigawatts installed per year from 2009 to 2012, when it was replaced by China, will still lead in terms of total number of units and capacity, with its 32.
Table 22: Brazil nuclear energy industry volume forecast: thousand gigawatts, 2011-16 35
A gigawatt is enough to supply about 243,000 homes in Japan.
According to the deputy manager of the Riyadh Exhibition Company, Mohammad Al-Hussaini, the Kingdom's demand for energy is expected to peak at 120 gigawatts by 2012, due to industrial expansion and a fast-growing population, which is expected to double by 2032.
The country will reduce its nuclear capacity goal of 80 gigawatts, Ren Dongming, Director of the Renewable Energy Development Center under the Economic Planner's Energy Research Institute, said at a Beijing conference on Thursday, without giving a new target.
World windpower capacity increased 31 percent in 2009, with an additional 38 gigawatts installed, according to the Global Wind Energy Council.
Solar manufacturers worldwide will produce some seven gigawatts worth of solar modules this year, but about half of that supply "will be left with no place to go," according to Harry Zervos, Ph.
The agreements support China's initiative to increase wind energy output from one gigawatt in 2005 to 100 gigawatts by 2020 and are the basis for additional future investments by GE Drivetrain Technologies in its local supply chain and advanced wind turbine drive train products.
American Superconductor will ship enough electrical wind farm components to produce 10 gigawatts of electrical power in China, Mr.
By 2020 the Government hopes that it could provide around 34 gigawatts - which using current technology would mean introducing some 7,000 turbines.
homes alone, a 1-watt limit would cut standby usage by about two-thirds, for a savings of more than 4 gigawatts (the output of four very large nuclear or coal power plants).
8 gigawatts of power generating capacity, with plans for an additional 4 gigawatts of capacity to be added by rehabilitating existing plants and building new ones.