Gilbreths

Gilbreths

disciplined family brought up to abide by strict, punctual standards. [Am. Lit.: Cheaper by the Dozen]
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The nightmare of the "gorilla ammaestrati" becomes a terrifying reality in Dario Fo's vision of a society in which all the individuals are reduced to their economic function and deprived even of a proper name (with the notable exception of Taylor and the Gilbreths, founders of the new forms of factory labor organization).
The sequel to Cheaper by the Dozen, Belles on Their Toes , follows up on the Gilbreths after Dad's death as the ever-enterprising Mother takes over her late husband's business while managing her oversized brood.
I remember that long ago in the '70s, when like the Gilbreths in Cheaper by the Dozen, we stopped at every promising clump of trees, when driving long distances such as from Lahore to Karachi, and back.
37) Indeed, it was the Gilbreths, a husband and wife duo of Taylorist disciples, who first translated worker knowledge and function into modern job descriptions in the form of work instruction cards.
Emerson, and the two Gilbreths as the key explanation, but others disagreed.
The Gilbreths, who were industrial engineers, were employed as "efficiency experts" by major industrial plants in the early 1900s.
He perceives the Gilbreths and Gantt as trying to soften the force of their mentor Taylor and hence began to conceive of and leverage power as being properly flowing from the bottom up in the organization.
It was, however, just one of the concepts the Gilbreths developed.
Should-cost is a state of mind described by Taylor, Gantt, and the Gilbreths.
Individuals such as the Gilbreths (micromotion studies), Shewhart (quality control), and Gantt (project management) continued Taylor's notion of increasing workplace efficiency.
But it was in the decade before World War I that work by Frederick Taylor, Henry Gantt, Harrington Emerson, the Gilbreths and others produced a body of knowledge and principles that could be dignified by the term "science.
This paper briefly examines the background and career of a remarkable woman pioneer in management, Lillian Gilbreth (1878-1972), and relates her challenges to achieving recognition in the "man's world" of the early twentieth century to the problems of women today.