hyperplasia

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Related to Gingival hyperplasia: gingivitis

hyperplasia

(hī'pərplā`zhə): see hypertrophyhypertrophy
, enlargement of a tissue or organ of the body resulting from an increase in the size of its cells. Such growth accompanies an increase in the functioning of the tissue. In normal physiology the growth in size of muscles (e.g.
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.

Hyperplasia

 

an increase in the number of structural elements of tissues or organs. In man and animals, hyperplasia is based on the intensified reproduction of cells and the formation of new structures. Hyperplasia is observed in various types of pathological growth of tissues (chronic productive inflammation and tumor), in regeneration, and in hypertrophy. Hyperplasia often carries with it compensating characters. In plants, it may be a local growth of tissues resulting from mitotic or amitotic cell division. It occurs with infection by destructive or pathogenic organisms, during trauma, and under the influence of growth stimulants, pesticides, and other preparations. The result of hyperplasia is the formation of galls, calluses, and warts.

hyperplasia

[‚hī·pər′plā·zhə]
(medicine)
Increase in cell number causing an increase in the size of a tissue or organ.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gingival hyperplasia as a first manifestation of Crohn's disease.
Clinical & pharmacologic correlations in cyclosporine induced gingival hyperplasia.
An adolescent patient aged 12 years with a fixed orthodontic appliance presented with generalised gingival hyperplasia due to bad dental hygiene (Fig.
Of the 14 children who had been treated with phenytoin in the past, evidence of gingival hyperplasia was observed in 3 of them.
11) Immunosuppressive agents commonly have the following oral side effects: xerostomia, excessive bleeding, poor wound healing, gingival hyperplasia, oral ulcerations, cancers and/or tumors, numbness or tingling, stomatitis, joint pain, and opportunistic infections such as oral candidiasis, herpes simplex/zoster, hairy leukoplakia, aphthous ulcers, cytomegalovirus, EBV and toxoplamosis.
Gingival hyperplasia was noted around the anterior aspects of both maxillary and mandibular alveolar ridges.
While oral hygiene cannot prevent gingival hyperplasia from occurring, good plaque control can limit the extent and severity of the overgrowth.