Ginzburg-Landau theory


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Ginzburg-Landau theory

[′ginz·bərg ′lan·dau̇ ‚thē·ə·rē]
(cryogenics)
A phenomenological theory of superconductivity which accounts for the coherence length; the ordered state of a superconductor is described by a complex order parameter which is similar to a Schrödinger wave function, but describes all the condensed superelectrons, rather than a single charged particle. Also known as Landau-Ginzburg theory.
References in periodicals archive ?
In [2], to describe the critical phenomena near the transition point, the authors consider two thermo-dynamically distinct phases and suggest the fractional Ginzburg-Landau theory in two interconnected ways.
According to the Ginzburg-Landau theory, a rotating disk of type II superconductor at the phase transition with low temperature (e.
Building on the Ginzburg-Landau theory, Abrikosov in 1957 proposed that only small regions of such materials--those around which electrons swirl in tiny vortices--lose superconductivity; the bulk of the material remains superconductive.
There is also link between Yang-Baxter theory and Ginzburg-Landau theory [6].