Cassini, Giovanni Domenico

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Cassini, Giovanni Domenico

 

(Jean Dominique Cas-sini). Born June 8, 1625, in Perinaldo; died Sept. 14, 1712, in Paris. Astronomer. An Italian by birth. Member of the Paris Academy of Sciences (1669). Director of the Paris Observatory (from 1669).

Cassini discovered the rotation of Jupiter (1665) and Mars (1666), four new satillites of Saturn (1671–84), and the division of Saturn’s rings into an inner ring and an outer ring by a dark gap (the Cassini division). He also investigated the optical liberation of the moon. Cassini made the first reliable determination of the sun’s parallax from joint observations of Mars with the French astronomer J. Richer (9.5“-10.0”; modern value, 8.8”).

References in periodicals archive ?
17th-century astronomers Giovanni Cassini and Jean Richer pegged the distance from the Earth to the sun as 140 million kilometers, just nine million kilometers off from the now-official figure.
Dione -- discovered in 1684 by astronomer Giovanni Cassini (after whom the spacecraft was named) -- orbits Saturn at roughly the same distance as our own moon orbits Earth.
His result is one of the largest improvements in determining the rotational period of a gas planet in almost 350 years--since Italian astronomer Giovanni Cassini made the first observations of Jupiter's Red Spot.
His result is one of the largest improvements in determining the rotational period of a gas planet in almost 350 years since Italian astronomer Giovanni Cassini made the first observations of Jupiter's Red Spot.
This moon was discovered by Giovanni Cassini in 1671 and years later found to have a dark side, now named Cassini Regio in his honour.
John, via e-mail In 1680, Giovanni Cassini defined the egg-shaped curve mathematically, which now takes his name and is called the Cassini Oval.