Giraldus Cambrensis


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Giraldus Cambrensis

(jĭrăl`dəs kămbrĕn`sĭs), c.1146–1223, Norman-Welsh churchman and historian, also called Gerald of Wales and Gerald de Barri. He was associated (from 1184) with the king and court of England. His historical works include two descriptive works on Ireland (resulting from a visit) and Descriptio Cambriae [description of Wales]. They contain rare glimpses of medieval life and folklore. He also wrote autobiographical works, lives of churchmen, pastoral admonitions, Latin poetry, and treatises on the rights of the see of St. David's.

Bibliography

See his autobiography (ed. and tr. by H. E. Butler, 1937); biography by R. Bartlett (1982).

Giraldus Cambrensis

literary name of Gerald de Barri. ?1146--?1223, Welsh chronicler and churchman, noted for his accounts of his travels in Ireland and Wales
References in periodicals archive ?
The 12th-century Welsh historian Giraldus Cambrensis, or Gerald of Wales, described it as being "fixed amongst a barbarous people" due to the regular attacks made on the priory by the local Welsh population.
Medieval clergyman and chronicler of his times Giraldus Cambrensis referred to the floating island on his journey through Wales in 1188.
One of such persons is Giraldus Cambrensis who posted his or her view on September 1, 2006 in Western Resistance website to severely and irrationally criticize and condemn Malaysia.
His relief is palpable: up until this point, his Irish experiences have involved all the worst possible discomforts of life on that island as noted by visitors and commentators from Giraldus Cambrensis through Edmund Spenser to Oliver Cromwell.
Giraldus Cambrensis also speaks warmly of him, both as grammarian and as"having been the pre-eminent literary figure in our times" (in literatura nostris diebus precipuus erat).
735); the ambitious cleric Gerald, self-styled Giraldus Cambrensis, Gerald of Wales (d.
Giraldus Cambrensis and Gerald ofWales), Ranult Higdcn, Geoffrey Chaucer, and Cardinal Thomas Wolsey.
This year the Coast presenter has been adding to his tally with a trip around Wales, in the footsteps of Giraldus Cambrensis (Gerald of Wales).
Since the days of Giraldus Cambrensis, North Pembrokeshire has fascinated antiquarians and archaeologists alike because of its rich prehistoric, early Christian and industrial age archaeology.
19) Giraldus Cambrensis also attributes twenty-four daughters to Brychan and provides a more detailed account of Eluned's martyrdom in the Itinerarium Cambriae c.
Giraldus Cambrensis made the distinction explicit: there were two Merlins, one, born of an incubus, called Merlin Ambrosius, who prophesied in the time of Vortigern (Merlin of the Historia), and another, born in Scotland, called Merlin Caledonius or Sylvester, who prophesied during the reign of Arthur (Merlin of the Vita).
And I have to admit that there is indeed an irony that it was such a one who recorded and preserved this instance of the true beauty of the Irish heritage: Kevin's story, after all, appears in the writings of Giraldus Cambrensis, one of the people who invaded Ireland in the twelfth century, one whom the Irish-language annalist Geoffrey Keating would call, five hundred years later, "the bull of the herd of those who wrote the false history of Ireland.