glacial

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Related to Glacials: glacial period, Glaciations

glacial

1. characterized by the presence of masses of ice
2. relating to, caused by, or deposited by a glacier
3. (of a chemical compound) of or tending to form crystals that resemble ice

Glacial

 

intervals of time in the geological history of the earth, characterized by a strong cooling of the climate and the development of extensive continental ice sheets.

glacial

[′glā·shəl]
(geology)
Pertaining to an interval of geologic time which was marked by an equatorward advance of ice during an ice age; the opposite of interglacial; these intervals are variously called glacial periods, glacial epochs, glacial stages, and so on.
(hydrology)
Pertaining to ice, especially in great masses such as sheets of land ice or glaciers.
References in periodicals archive ?
750 Ma) and equivalent Rapitan glacials, the second that of the Marinoan and Vendian glacial deposits (c.
Following widespread dismissal of Agassiz's controversial claim to have discovered glacial deposits in the Amazon in 1866, the idea fell out of favour.
The animals were killed therefore at the same instant when glacial conditions overwhelmed the countries they inhabited.
Glacial landforms were seen as the product of 'God's great plough'.
The study of pre-Pleistocene glacial deposits begins with A.
He and his colleagues suggest that the average temperatures at the equator were lower in glacial periods than during the interglacial warm spells.
However, a drier climate during glacial periods also might have led to expansion of the deserts, and lower sea levels would have exposed great expanses of mud and ooze that could dry up and blow away, he notes.
He thinks it's much more likely that the large amounts of dust billowing to Greenland in glacial times were a result of strong storms.
Because the edge of the sea ice extended farther south during glacial times than it does now and even surrounded Greenland, temperatures on that ice sheet then were as much as 23 [degrees] C colder than they are today.