glacial retreat

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glacial retreat

[¦glā·shəl ri′trēt]
(geology)
A condition occurring when backward melting at the front of a glacier takes place at a rate exceeding forward motion.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the end of the chain, the rural people of Peru are seeing their daily lives disrupted by the glacier retreat.
While most of Antarctica is remaining cold, rapid increases in summer ice melt, glacier retreat and ice shelf collapses are being observed in Antarctic Peninsula, where the stronger winds passing through Drake Passage are making the climate warm exceptionally quickly.
Most of the continent remains cold but glacier retreat, ice shelf collapses and the rapid rise in summer ice melt were being observed in the Antarctic Peninsula.
This rise has taken place concurrently with a rise in atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, loss of sea ice, glacier retreat, sea level rise, more intense heat waves, stronger hurricanes, and more droughts.
When evidence emerged that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change] had adopted unsubstantiated data about rates of Himalayan glacier retreat, the problem signalled not just a failure in the organization's review process, but a failure of organizational culture.
This continued and often significant glacier retreat is a wakeup call that change is happening .
The topics discussed are wide-ranging and include IPCC reports, Arctic and Antarctic climate, climate modelling, hurricanes and other extreme events, global warming, greenhouse gases, glacier retreat, oceans, paleo-climate, responses to contrarians, solar forcing, future climate projections, climate in the media, geo-engineering and sun-earth connections.
Field observations and historical records have been used to document the current pace of glacier retreat in the Andes (Francou et al.
The theory is based not purely on monitoring of temperature variations but a host of other, more conclusive factors eg ice core samples, glacier retreat, erosion of the ice caps and disturbance of marine ecosystems.
The fastest recorded glacier retreat in history, a glacier 4,000 feet thick and extending more than 100 miles, has withdrawn to reveal one of Alaska s most pristine wilderness areas--Glacier Bay National Park.
Many proglacial lakes experience higher sedimentation during times of more extensive ice cover or rapid glacier retreat (Leonard, 1986, 1997; Menounos, 2002).
There are others who view the ongoing glacier retreat as a recovery from the earth's Middle Ice Age.