globalization

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globalization

Operating around the world. Although many large companies have globalized for decades, the Web, more than any other phenomenon, has enabled the smallest company to have a global presence. See localization.

globalization

A mulifaceted process in which the world is becoming more and more interconnected and communication is becoming instanteneous. Aspects of this process include:
  1. the transformation of the spatial arrangement and organization of social relations involving ‘action at a distance’, a stretching of social relations and transactions (and power), including instantaneous communications across time-space;
  2. the increasing extensity, intensity, velocity and impact of global social relations and transactions (see Held et al. 1999);
  3. the creation of new networks and nodes – the ‘network society’ (CASTELLS) – associated with the new levels of dependence on knowledge/ information and ‘expert systems – the ‘information’ or ‘knowledge society’ – as well as the new risks associated with this – RISK SOCIETY;
  4. a dialect between the global and the local in which (consistent with a dialect of power and the duality of structure) the outcome is not a simple triumph of the centre over the periphery, mere Americanization’, or suchlike (see also MCDONALDIZATION).

As Held et al. (1999) suggest, a ‘vibrant’ ongoing debate exists on the characterization of globalization between three groups of theorists:

  1. ‘hyperglobalizers’ (e.g. Ohmae 1990; 1995) for whom global marketization is the main driver;
  2. 'S ceptics’ (notably Hirst and Thompson 1996a and b), who play down the level and distinctiveness of the change;
  3. ‘transformationalists’, including GIDDENS, for whom globalization is a distinctive new phase such that societies and states across the globe are experiencing profound social as well as economic changes – a ‘massive shake-out’ of social relations, economies, governance and politics – as they seek to adapt to an increasingly interconnected but also unpredictable and uncertain world.
References in periodicals archive ?
In examining the central theme that global capitalism has led to increased inequality and social exclusions of sectors of society, the book remains inconclusive.
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This article is adapted from his forth coming book Against the Dead Hand: The Uncertain Struggle for Global Capitalism
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hegemony laid the cornerstone for post-war global capitalism, and by doing so provided the conditions of its own unraveling nearly four decades later.
of Arizona) uses the conceptual tools of economic sociology to advance a radical understanding of the place and fate of work under global capitalism.
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The United States has tossed international law to the four winds and invaded another nation using the most transparent of pretexts, global capitalism has penetrated every corner of life, including art, education, and leisure time, and meanwhile the art world carries on, business as usual.
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However, the editors argue this literature, despite its critique of global capitalism, is too reformist and too willing to accept capitalist markets as necessary for economic organization.
Clearly, global capitalism does not equal global liberty.
The conference, which is oversubscribed, builds on a groundbreaking Birmingham forum held in the summer of 1999 at the Newman College, Proclaiming the Gospel of Justice in a World of Global Capitalism.

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