glucocorticoid

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glucocorticoid

[¦glü·kō¦kȯrd·ə‚kȯid]
(biochemistry)
A corticoid that affects glucose metabolism; secreted principally by the adrenal cortex.
References in periodicals archive ?
such as glucocorticosteroids, associated with allostasis have protective
Adrenocortical suppression should be suspected if a patient has received glucocorticosteroid therapy:
Hyperglycemia normally occurs within minutes of severe TBI as part of the sympatho-adrenal stress response[3,43] and may be a proxy indicator for injury severity in humans,[11,48] Particularly in the setting of ischemia, it aggravates injury by driving anaerobic metabolism, enhancing increased glycolysation of membrane molecules, IC acidification, free radical formation, blood flow alterations and other effects,[11,43,48,65] Glucocorticosteroid use after injury amplifies the metabolic response, notably increased gluconeogenesis; proteolysis and lipolysis for gluconeogenesis, peripheral insulin resistance, hyperglycemia and subsequent osmotic diuresis.
In our pivotal clinical studies, three times more patients achieved clinical remission and mucosal healing with UCERIS compared with patients taking placebo, and no clinically significant differences in glucocorticosteroid side effects were seen versus placebo after eight weeks of treatment.
The key factors impeding healing included JDMS; decreased mobility; persistently low serum magnesium, zinc, and albumin; malnutrition; infection; and prolonged glucocorticosteroid therapy.
Principal digressions of consensus approach involve topical glucocorticosteroid monotherapy despite lesions exceeding 3 Percent body surface.
The companies have signed an agreement giving Pfizer a right of first refusal regarding OTC rights for Rhinocort Aqua, a pump spray containing the glucocorticosteroid budesonide, with a local anti-inflammatory effect, for the treatment of non-infectious rhinitis.
After four days of glucocorticosteroid therapy, the patient's oxygen saturation normalized and his symptoms abated.
Very few intranasal glucocorticosteroid therapies have been approved for children, and none is available for children younger than 3 years of age.
Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids can produce reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression with the potential for clinical glucocorticosteroid insufficiency.
Entocort (budesonide) is glucocorticosteroid for inflammatory bowel diseases.
Because sarcoidosis can manifest as vocal fold paralysis, (6,7) our patient was treated with an oral glucocorticosteroid.