glueball

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glueball

[′glü‚bȯl]
(particle physics)
A hadron consisting entirely of gluons, without any quarks. Also known as bound glue state; gluonia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quantum chromodynamics theory predicts that under certain circumstances, gluons themselves can stick together briefly to form composite particles called glueballs.
To help guide the search for glueballs, Weingarten and his coworkers turned to a simplification of quantum chromodynamics.
A calculation that took 2 years on a powerful special-purpose computer has provided evidence that a hypothesized subnuclear particle called a glueball actually exists.
Soon after, they calculated that the lightest glueball would have a mass (expressed in energy units) of about 1,707 megaelectronvolts (MeV).
Several decades ago, claims concerning the existence of glueballs have been published by QCD supporters (see [11], p.