Gluttony


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Gluttony

See also Greed.
Belch, Sir Toby
gluttonous and lascivious fop. [Br. Lit.: Twelfth Night]
Biggers, Jack
one of the best known “feeders” of eighteenth-century England. [Br. Hist.: Wallechinsky, 377]
Ciacco
Florentine damned to the third circle of Hell for gluttony. [Ital. Lit.: Dante Inferno]
crab
loves to devour oysters. [Medieval Animal Symbolism: White, 210–211]
Dagwood
relieves tensions by making and eating gargantuan sandwiches. [Comics: “Blondie” in Horn, 118]
Fat Freddy
character who loves food more than anything else. [Comics: “The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers” in Horn, 239–240]
Gargantua
enormous eater who ate salad lettuces as big as walnut trees. [Fr. Lit.: Brewer Handbook, 406]
Gastrolaters
people worshiped food in the form of Manduce. [Fr. Lit.: Pantagruel]
hedgehog
attribute of gourmandism personified. [Animal Symbolism: Hall, 146]
Jones, Nicely Nicely
Damon Runyon’s Broadway glutton. [Am. Lit. and Drama: Guys and Dolls]
Jughead
character renowned for his insatiable hankering for hamburgers. [Comics: “Archie” in Horn, 87]
Laphystius
epithet of Zeus, meaning “gluttonous.” [Gk. Myth. Zimmerman, 292–293]
Lucullus
Roman epicure chiefly remembered for his enormous consumption of food. [Rom. Hist.: Payton, 406]
lupin
traditional symbol of voracity. [Plant Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 175]
Manduce
idol worshiped by the Gastrolaters. [Fr. Lit.: Pantagruel]
Pantagruel
son of Gargantua noted for his continual thirst. [Fr. Lit.: Jobes, II, 1234]
Snorkel, Sergeant
character devoted to God, country, and belly. [Comics: “Beetle Bailey” in Horn, 106 ]
Sobakevitch
huge, bearlike landowner astonishes banquet guests by devouring an entire sturgeon. [Russ. Lit.: Gogol Dead Souls]
Stivic, Michael “Meathead”
Archie’s son-in-law; has insatiable appetite. [TV: “All in the Family” in Terrace, I, 47]
Willey, Walter
servant who achieved fame through his public gluttony. [Br. Hist.: Wallechinsky, 378]
Wimpy, J. Wellington
Popeye’s companion, a corpulent dandy with a tremendous capacity for hamburgers. [Comics: “Thimble Theater” in Horn, 657–658]
Winnie-the-Pooh
lovable, bumbling devourer of honey. [Children’s Lit.: Winnie-the-Pooh]
Wood, Nicholas
his gastronomic abilities inspired poems and songs; at one historic sitting, he consumed all the edible meat of a sheep. [Br. Hist.: Wallechinsky, 378]
Wood, Willy
“ate up cream cheese, roast beef, piecrust”; incessant eater. [Nurs. Rhyme: Baring-Gould, 158]
Yogi Bear
character with insatiable appetite; always stealing picnic baskets from visitors to Jellystone Park. [Am. Comics: Misc.; TV: Terrace, II, 448–449]
References in periodicals archive ?
The malice of gluttony comes from the fact that it makes the soul a slave to the body, it brutalises man, weakens his intellectual and moral life, and insensibly paves the way to voluptuous pleasure.
The former all-you-can-eat format served as an unrestrained invitation to gluttony and waste, colliding with the very spirit of Ramadan," said Marya Khan, general manager of marketing at Pizza Hut Pakistan, according to the Telegraph.
The monthly event on Victoria Street indulges in each of the seven deadly sins on a seven-week cycle - that's lust, envy, greed, sloth, gluttony, wrath and jealousy.
Greed, gluttony, hedonism - these are all part of human nature, and not the pretty part.
The character defect of gluttony can wear a strange mask.
AS Christmases come and go the more I realise that enjoyment of it has nothing to do with commercialism, gluttony and getting drunk.
Although there is no definitive list of mortal sins, many believers accept the broad seven deadly sins or capital vices laid down in the sixth century by Pope Gregory the Great and popularized in the Middle Ages by Dante in The Inferno: lust, gluttony, avarice, sloth, anger, envy and pride.
Six "Sins" are scheduled to follow: Lust, The Sin of Desire (mixed berry); Envy, The Sin of Resent (lemon-line), Wrath, The Sin of Vengeance, (grape); Pride, The Sin of Arrogance (vanilla); Gluttony, The Sin of Indulgence (chocolate) and Sloth The Sin of Indifference (to be determined).
The Seven Deadly Sins are avarice, envy, gluttony, lust, pride, sloth and wrath.
After this there are more detailed studies of the poem's section on gluttony, Dante's view of our heavenly 'bodies', and his treatment of Manfred and Marsyas as based on contemporary knowledge of the body.
Pride, envy, gluttony, lust, anger, greed and sloth - these are known as the seven deadly sins.
For those not already tormented by the excesses of the festive season, I offer Jacopo Ligozzi's glorious Allegory of Gluttony, dated 1590, which will be offered by Jean-Luc Baroni Ltd.