glycemic index

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Related to Glycemic: hypoglycemic

glycemic index

[glī¦sēm·ik ′in‚deks]
(medicine)
A ranking of foods based on how they affect blood glucose (sugar) levels in the 2-3 hours after eating, foods with carbohydrates that break down quickly during digestion have the highest glycemic indexes.
References in periodicals archive ?
What therapeutic drugs are currently marketed for glycemic control, how are they administered, who markets them, and what is the size of the global market?
Glycemic Index, "net" carbs), while the next month's article focuses on the advantage of fortifying with dietary fiber.
A dense European whole wheat bread would have a lower glycemic index than a fluffy whole wheat bread made of finely milled flour.
Diabetes is highly prevalent among Americans aged 65 years and older, and tight glycemic control achieved through medication use poses significant threats to them--chiefly, hypoglycemia --without imparting the benefits seen in younger, healthier patients, said Dr.
According to the international table of glycemic index, the GI of different varieties of honey is in 32-87 range [5].
Ochs says, Mobanu's patented Glycemic Threshold[R] calculator helps users monitor the body's fat-storing and fat-burning hormones, and determine the ideal diet for them.
of the Centre of Inflammation and Metabolism, Copenhagen, Denmark, and colleagues, although moderate-intensity aerobic exercise can improve glycemic control, individuals with ambient hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) are more likely to be nonresponders.
In the "Overview," we learn that the glycemic index was introduced by Dr.
Now you're not just measuring the glycemic index rating.
The glycemic index is represented by a scale from 1 to 100.
This study investigated whether a diet with a high glycemic load (GL) and high total carbohydrate level is associated with an increased risk of BC.
An easy tip to help you make better meal time decisions is to consider the glycemic index (GI) of the food you're about to eat.