Glyptodonts

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Glyptodonts

 

(Glyptodontidae), extinct mammals of the order Edentata, related to the armadillos. They existed from the early Eocene to the Pleistocene. Their size varied greatly, with the largest reaching a length of 2 m. The body of the glyptodont was covered with bony shields or a solid shell like that of the turtle. The short limbs had broad, hoof-like claws. The skull was small; there were no incisors or canine teeth, and the tall, prismatic teeth indicate a diet of coarse vegetation. Glyptodonts were distributed primarily in South America and also in the southern part of North America during the Pliocene and Pleistocene.

REFERENCES

Osnovy Paleontologii: Mlekopitaiushchie. Moscow, 1962.
Romer, A. S. Paleontologiia pozvonochnykh. Moscow-Leningrad, 1939. Pages 342-44. (Translated from English.)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Paleontologists have long suspected that glyptodonts (illustrated above) are related to modern armored mammals.
Comparative material included glyptodont material housed at the following Mexican collections: Coleccion de Macromamiferos, Museo de Paleontologia, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Pachuca, Hidalgo, specimens UAHMP-428, UAHMP-429, UAHMP-431, UAHMP-426, UAHMP-427, UAHMP-430, UAHMP-960, UAHMP-967, UAHMP-358, UAHMP-919A, UAHMP-919B, UAHMP-919D, and UAHMP-919E; Museo de Paleontologia Maria del Carmen Perrilliat M.
The 5-foot-tall, almost 1ton glyptodont looks like a rat covered in armor.
Assigning an Irvingtonian age to the locality is based mainly on the presence of the glyptodont Glyptotherium arizonae and the camel Hemiauchenia cf.
Washington, August 12 ( ANI ): A new study has revealed that Earth is still recovering from the loss of giant sloths and armadillo-like glyptodonts and others massive beasts of the last ice age, 12,000 years ago.
Members of the Xenarthra (Order Cingulata: armadillos, glyptodonts, pampatheres; Order Pilosa: anteaters, sloths), have long been regarded as noteworthy among mammalian species for the uniqueness of their dentition, both in structure and dental formula.
Within a couple thousand years, North America had lost all its mammoths, mastodons, giant ground-cloths, tapirs, camels, llamas, glyptodonts, giant beavers and other large species.
Additionally, the glyptodonts were armadillo-like animals that measured up to sixteen feet long and carried hard, turtle-like shells on their backs, the only mammals so protected.