Glyptodonts


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Glyptodonts

 

(Glyptodontidae), extinct mammals of the order Edentata, related to the armadillos. They existed from the early Eocene to the Pleistocene. Their size varied greatly, with the largest reaching a length of 2 m. The body of the glyptodont was covered with bony shields or a solid shell like that of the turtle. The short limbs had broad, hoof-like claws. The skull was small; there were no incisors or canine teeth, and the tall, prismatic teeth indicate a diet of coarse vegetation. Glyptodonts were distributed primarily in South America and also in the southern part of North America during the Pliocene and Pleistocene.

REFERENCES

Osnovy Paleontologii: Mlekopitaiushchie. Moscow, 1962.
Romer, A. S. Paleontologiia pozvonochnykh. Moscow-Leningrad, 1939. Pages 342-44. (Translated from English.)
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References in periodicals archive ?
By the researchers' calculations, the glyptodonts diverged from these armadillos about 35 million years ago, from a common ancestor that weighed six kilograms.
He thought the extinct animal, later dubbed a glyptodont, must have looked like a supersized armadillo.
As a result, the identification of North American glyptodonts relies mostly on characters of the carapace and osteoderms (Gillette and Ray, 1981).
Apart from long-extinct animals, like mammoths and glyptodonts, there were also some familiar faces which survived the test of time - the muskoxen, cougar and bison.
The sweet spot of a biological hammer: the centre of percussion of glyptodont (Mammalia: Xenarthra) tail clubs.
According to Dr Blanco, of the Faculty of Science in Montevideo, Uruguay, "We concluded several large species of glyptodonts used the tail clubs mainly for powerful blows in ritualised fighting but the small species used the tail clubs also in other situations as defence against predators.
The thick armor and large size of adult glyptodonts and pampatheres probably would have been a deterrent even for a pack of dire wolves.
New 4,300 YR 14C age of glyptodonts at Lujan river (Buenos Aires, Argentina) and its implications.
What caused the virtually simultaneous demise of mammoths, mastodons and saber-toothed cats, not to mention native horses, ground sloths, native camels, armadillo-like glyptodonts, giant peccaries, mountain deer, giant beavers, four-pronged antelopes, dire wolves, native lions and giant short-faced bears?
6E-F) is the right dentary fragment of a glyptodont with very damaged teeth.
2007: Late Pleistocene (Rancholabrean) Glyptodont and Pampathere (Xenarthra, Cingulata) from Sonora, Mexico.