Glyptothek


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Glyptothek

(glüp'tōtāk`), museum in Munich on the Königsplatz, founded by Louis I of Bavaria to house his collection of ancient and modern sculptures. Among these is the famous Barberini faun (c.200 B.C.). The neoclassical building, designed by Leo von KlenzeKlenze, Leo von
, 1784–1864, German architect and landscape and portrait painter. He was court architect to Jérôme Bonaparte of Westphalia and to Louis I of Bavaria, for whom he built many structures in the Italian Renaissance and neo-classical styles.
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, was constructed between 1816 and 1830. Its severe, imposing Ionic portico projects from a wall containing six large sculptures in niches. The interior is structured with domical vaulting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contributors are arranged here in roughly chronological order from there, covering the British Museum, the Uffizi, Museo Pio-Clementino, eighteenth-century German princely picture collections, the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Stockholm Royal Museum, the Louvre, the Prado, the National Gallery, the Altes Museum, and the Glyptothek and Pinakothek.
And for a long time, the collections they held remained in private ownership: Adrian von Buttlar and Benedicte Savoy report that after the revolution of 1848-49 Ludwig I of Bavaria reminded the populace that all works of art in Munich's Glyptothek and Neue Pinakothek 'belonged to him, and that his generosity in showing them to the public was not to be taken for granted'.
the de-restoration of the warrior statue from Aegina in the Munich Glyptothek, in practice pp.
The stones were restored speculatively into an integrated form and displayed in the Munich Glyptothek until the 1960s when the elements that had been fabricated to complete it were removed and the fragments alone left on display.
The sculptures arrived in Munich just in time for the opening of the new Glyptothek, a museum entirely devoted to Classical and Egyptian art.
Or, looking at galleries, think of the differences between the elegant and sensuously austere (though firmly disciplinarian) early nineteenth-century Neo-Classical Glyptothek by von Klenze in Munich and Louis Kahn's luminous and fluid Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth.
boasts some priceless treasures including marble statues in the Glyptothek which the Greeks desperately want back.
Dine visited Munich, Germany, intending to study the paintings in the famed Pinakothek, but was most taken with the Greek and Roman sculptures in the Glyptothek, one of the few museums in the world devoted to the exhibition of antiquities.
Klenze was responsible for two among the remarkable number of art galleries and museums the city can sfiU boast: the Glyptothek and the Alte Pinakothek.
They completed one side of Konigsplatz, an axially placed square in which von Klenze's Glyptothek (perhaps the best Neo-Classical building in Munich) also stands.