goal

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Related to Goals: personal goals

goal

1. (in various sports) the net, basket, etc. into or over which players try to propel the ball, puck, etc., to score
2. Sport
a. a successful attempt at scoring
b. the score so made
3. (in soccer, hockey, etc.) the position of goalkeeper

goal

(programming)
In logic programming, a predicate applied to its arguments which the system attempts to prove by matching it against the clauses of the program. A goal may fail or it may succeed in one or more ways.
References in periodicals archive ?
Magic Rive beat Newage Cables in the fourth match by three goals to two goals.
The reason I was shouting (about goals, not profanity) is because Tottenham Hotspur v Manchester United is always a match which I instinctively associate with lots of onion-bag bulging.
Desert Christian/Lancaster 7, Marshall 0: Robyn Estrada had a hat trick -- giving her 35 goals -- and Kristyn Richards scored three times for the top-seeded Knights (21-1-2) in the second-round win at Lancaster National Soccer Center.
Student-led conferences, however, include students in the forum, often asking them to act as the leader of the meeting, thereby creating a nurturing environment in which they become excited about sharing their academic achievements and goals with their parents (Countryman & Schroeder, 1996; Tuinstra & Hiatt-Michael, 2004).
This will, actually, carry the ball out of the danger area, so we want the opposite to be done--force the ball into the middle of the goal area.
The goals and rewards of one team member must not conflict with the goals and rewards of another.
Ideally, patients or surrogates determine their desired goals and results from clinical care.
To do so, the process of setting financial and operational goals must strike the right balance between short-term stretch and long-term sustainability.
Eggen and Kauckak (1999) support this point when they indicated that "one way of increasing commitment is to guide students in setting their own goals, rather than to impose goals on them (p.
While it's important to know the difference between short-and long-term goals, every goal you make for yourself needs to be SMART.
You become accountable for appropriate communication of goals and feedback.
As such, hopeful thinking always includes three components: goals, pathways thinking, and agency thinking.