goanna

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Related to Goannas: mole crickets, cassowaries, soldier beetles

goanna

any of various Australian monitor lizards
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Aboriginal peoples have lived in Western Australia for at least 36,000 years, and ancient lizard remains found at archeological sites show that people have hunted goannas for much of that time.
Goanna populations were densest where the Martu hunted most.
Sean Doody, a post-doctoral fellow with the University of Canberra says 'The latest reports indicate that the cane toads have now hit our monitoring sites, so I expect that when we do our next field trip later this year we will get a greater insight into how the toads impact the goannas and crocodiles in the area'.
Her Dreamings include Goanna (lizard), Billabong (waterhole) and the long-necked tortoise or Minhala.
The most common themes are the Darling River itself and associated rivers and lakes (The Paroo and Warrego Rivers and Lake Woychucca); Barkindji people (including mythic, historic and living); ancestral beings (most specifically) Ngatji (The Rainbow Serpent); native freshwater fish and river turtles, goannas, and the two moiety 'totems' of kangaroo and emu.
Badger explained to him that goannas have five claws and they are not straight.
Their depicted images consist of six human figures, five turtles, two goannas, two crocodiles (Figure 1), two birds and a dugong (Figure 2).
Distinctive sea turtle designs that have elaborate stylised anatomical and infill detail feature in Port Essington bark-imagery, while goannas shown as if seen from above, but sometimes with heads in profile, are also common.
Adults take the larger goannas opportunistically, bringing them in to be thrown on the campfire and cooked whole.
The Ngalirrkewern site contains many paintings depicting the economically important animals for the Kuninjku, such as a great variety of fish, crocodiles, macropods, lizards, goannas and snakes.
In a comprehensive investigation of the possible nutritional/medicinal value of termite mounds used by Aboriginal people in the Northern Territory, Foti (1994) found that termitaria were used for gastric disorders or after eating certain foods, like yams, turtle or goannas.
Old trees with hollows, trees frequently used by goannas, possums, sugar gliders, yellow-footed antechinus, or brush-tailed phascogale, the movements of small birds, all provide segues into other stories about the forest.