Golaud

Golaud

jealousy leads to the murder of his brother, Pelléas. [Fr. Opera: Debussy, Pelléas and Mélisande, Westerman, 196]
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But as we progress through the scenes the visual images do become monotonous, focussing chiefly on an oblong kind of trunk which at various times serves as the entry to the castle vaults, an immovable stone, and the well where Melisande loses the ring Golaud has given her.
Based on Maurice Maeterlinck's symbolist allegory of the triangular relationship between Melisande, a mysterious lost soul, and the halfbrothers Golaud and Pelleas, the opera is a fairytale without a happy ending.
Based on Maurice Maeterlinck's symbolist allegory of the triangular relationship between Melisande, a mysterious lost soul, and the half-brothers Golaud and Pelleas, the opera is a fairytale without a happy ending.
Baritone Gregory Dahl gave a powerful performance as Golaud, a man consumed by jealousy.
His Symphonie is primarily composed of Debussy's orchestral interludes, and given the predominance of themes associated with Golaud, Barthel-Calvet wryly notes that it could easily have been titled the Golaud el Melisande Symphonie.
Gerald Finley, in the very grateful role of Golaud, projected that combination of blind anguish and sudden rage that makes up his tortured soul-Debussy's Wotan
And Christopher Purves was as devastating a Golaud as he was a Wozzeck; his voice curdling and darkening as jealousy slowly kills his character from the inside.
Golaud comes across the mysterious Melisande at a well, and she attracts the interest of not just him but his half-brother Pelleas.
Even though Pelleas has been something of a signature role, he is ready to try his hand at Golaud in the not-too-distant future, and will revisit Onegin and Wozzeck in the next few seasons.
Pelleas is Golaud's younger half-brother, and he has instant affinity with Melisande, which becomes love and leads to his death at the hand of Golaud.
Set in Arthurian times in a neverland called Allemonde, its simple tale begins with the prince Golaud encountering a mysterious young lady with luxuriant hair.
That Finley's account of Sachs, as The Independent suggested, "could be the pinnacle of his career" is surely premature, but the role that "made me concentrate on my singing like nothing else" was surely a highlight in a season that (just in opera) has seen him sing Debussy's Golaud, Rossini's William Tell, Bizet's Zurga and the lawyer Howard K.