Golden Bull of Charles IV of 1356

Golden Bull of Charles IV of 1356

 

the decree adopted by the imperial diets of Nuremberg (January 1356) and Metz (December 1356) and approved by Emperor Charles IV as the fundamental legislative act of the Holy Roman Empire. The Golden Bull legitimized the order that had evolved for the selection of the emperor by the electors. It also established the time and the place (Frankfurt-am-Main) at which the electors should meet and the regulations governing the electoral procedure. The Golden Bull defined the ranks and responsibilities of the electors and allowed them such privileges as the rights of coinage, mining, and taxation. It also contained decrees proclaiming the Landfriede (public peace). The Golden Bull retained its significance as a constitutional act until 1806.

REFERENCES

Zeumer, K. Die goldene Bulle Kaiser Karls IV, parts 1–2. Weimar, 1908.
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