Golden mean


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golden mean

[‚gōld·ən ′mēn]
(mathematics)

Golden mean

A proportional relationship devised by the Greeks that expresses the ideal relationship of unequal parts. It is obtained by dividing a line so that the shorter part is to the longer part as the longer part is to the whole line. It can be stated thus: a is to b as b is to a+ b. If we assign the value of 1 to a, and solve as a quadratic equation, then b = 1.618034. Therefore, the golden mean is 1:1.618.

golden mean

or section a proportion between the length and width of a rectangle or two portions of a line, said to be ideal. [Fine Arts: Misc.]
References in periodicals archive ?
It is obvious that, in discussing the "mean", the "middle", or the "neutralities", there are many similarities between The Golden Mean and Neutrosophy.
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The English believed that English foods helped individuals achieve that golden mean, Eden argues.
After reviewing the classical treatments of Golden Mean, Fibonacci numbers, and Platonic solids, he covers the mathematics of harmony and its application in computer science.
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However, the historical heritage was not duplicated--the architects searched for the golden mean between past and present.
We ask you readers to practice the old Roman Republic virtues of moderation and restraint in your celebration: Remember the Golden Mean.
In her first full-length novel, The Golden Mean, Annabel Lyon has Aristotle tell us the tale.
The authors conclude that Aristotle's metaphor of the golden mean provides a frame work for a moral decision-making process, which can be beneficially utilised in complex cases involving precarious newborns.
As will be argued, Aristotle's metaphor of the golden mean provides a framework for such a process.