golem

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golem

(gō`ləm) [Heb.,=an undeveloped lump], in medieval Jewish legend, an automatonlike servant made of clay and given life by means of a charm, or shem [Heb.,=name, or the name of God]. Golems were attributed in Jewish legend to several rabbis in different European countries. The most famous legend centered around Rabbi Löw, of 16th-century Prague. After molding the golem and endowing it with life, Rabbi Löw was forced to destroy the clay creature after it ran amok.

Bibliography

See J. Trachtenberg, Jewish Magic and Superstition (1939, repr. 1961); M. Idel, Golem (1989).

golem

automaton homunculus performs duties not permissible for Jews. [Jew. Legend: Jobes, 674]
See: Servant
References in periodicals archive ?
Bound together in the Jewish cultural psyche, the Maharal and the Golem of Prague are unique figures in Jewish folklore.
Given this, it is a tribute to the Maharal and the incredibly high esteem he was held in by both Jews and non-Jews that the Golem of Prague has become solely his creation.