elbow

(redirected from Golfer's elbow)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to Golfer's elbow: tennis elbow

elbow

1. the joint between the upper arm and the forearm, formed by the junction of the radius and ulna with the humerus
2. the corresponding joint or bone of birds or mammals

Elbow

Sharp corner in a pipe or conduit, as opposed to a bend, which has a larger radius of curvature.

elbow

[′el‚bō]
(anatomy)
The arm joint formed at the junction of the humerus, radius, and ulna.
(design engineering)
A fitting that connects two pipes at an angle, often of 90°.
A sharp corner in a pipe.
(electromagnetism)
In a waveguide, a bend of comparatively short radius, normally 90°, and sometimes for acute angles down to 15°.
(geography)
A sharp change in direction of a coast line, channel, bank, or so on.

elbow

elbows, 1
1. A pipe, sheet metal, or conduit fitting having a bend, usually 90°; a 90° elbow is also called an ell.
2. A crossette, 1.
3. A shoulder, 1.

Elbow

ignorant, blundering constable. [Br. Lit.: Measure for Measure]
References in periodicals archive ?
The study involved 20 patients with golfer's elbow, a common condition that is characterized by pain on the inside of the elbow (medial epicondyle) and is aggravated by repetitive use of the wrist flexor muscles.
I have been troubled by severe golfer's elbow for the past three years and received numerous cortisone injections that have had little effect.
Golfer's elbow, known medically as Medial Epicondylitis, is caused by repetitive injury to the muscles that are used to pull the hand down, the wrist flexors, located on the palm side of the forearm.
To avoid golfer's elbow, caused by a strain of the muscles in the inside of the forearm -- perform wrist and forearm stretching exercises and try not to overemphasize your wrists when swinging.
At one stage it was doubtful if he would even start this year's event after suffering golfer's elbow on the practice range at Loch Lomond last week so he was pleased simply to have lasted the course.
He is suffering from medial epicondylitis, more commonly known as golfer's elbow and something that occurs after too much practice.
Shapiro recommends that golfers of all ages regularly participate in a muscle conditioning program to not only reduce the risk of experiencing golfer's elbow -- one of the most common golf injuries -- but also to promote flexibility and longevity in their game throughout the season.
Faldo is still receiving treatment for the golfer's elbow injury which ruled him out of the Loch Lomond event and Montgomerie has revealed that he is still being troubled by a sore ankle.