Golgi tendon organ

(redirected from Golgi tendon)
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Golgi tendon organ

[′gȯl·jē ′ten·dən ‚ȯr·gən]
(physiology)
Any of the kinesthetic receptors situated near the junction of muscle fibers and a tendon which act as muscle-tension recorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
muscle spindles or Golgi tendon organ) or in the neighbouring skin (tactile mechanoreceptors).
Golgi Tendon Organs that detect tension applied to the muscle tendon during muscle contraction/stretch.
It is possible that the increased intensity caused increased tension and consequent muscle-tendon autogenic inhibition due to the action of the Golgi tendon organs (6).
The possible reduced strength after stretching at different insistence times can be partially explained by an autogenic inhibition generated by the stretching owed the activation of Golgi tendon organs (CHALMERS, 2004) which may cause a decrease in the excitability of [alpha]-motoneurons (FOWLES et al.
Traditional static stretching involves increasing tissue extensibility by activating Golgi tendon organs, which occurs after 7 to 10 seconds of holding an isometric stretch at a certain point of tension.
On the other hand, we can not talk about PNF technics without making reference to Golgi tendon organ and Muscle spindles.
For example Dietz et al (6) have shown that the CNS can reset Golgi tendon receptors and related reflex arcs so that they function as delicate antigravity receptors.
skin, tendon, joint capsule) and muscles activates Golgi tendon organ.
GTOs, otherwise known as Golgi tendon organs, are not located in joints.
Six seconds is used because, according to the neurophysiology of the muscle, it takes at least six seconds for the Golgi tendon organ to send impulses that trigger the muscle to relax and become receptive to the stretch.
Also located within the muscle tendon is another sensor called the golgi tendon organ (GTO), which functions in sensing how much tension is being placed on the tendon.
When a muscle in a stretched position is held and then contracted, proprioceptors (sensory end organs in muscles, tendons, and joints) called golgi tendon organs (GTOs) are stimulated.