gonad

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gonad

an animal organ in which gametes are produced, such as a testis or an ovary

gonad

[′gō‚nad]
(anatomy)
A primary sex gland; an ovary or a testis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The serotonergic system is in close reciprocal relationship with the gonadal hormones and has been identified as the most plausible target for interventions.
Although human personality is complex and greatly influenced by society and culture, there appear to be subtle but essential gender differences in behavior in human beings, the result of the effect of gonadal hormones on the development and function of the brain.
However, concentrations of gonadal hormones in cord serum, namely testosterone in girls and estradiol in boys, varied in association with PCDD/Fs and PCBs measured in maternal blood during pregnancy and in maternal milk (Cao et al.
2005) examined the relationships between various urinary PEs and gonadal hormones among Swedish males, but they did not observe any significant effects of PEs on serum fT.
Disturbances in sexual differentiation occur when endogenous and/or exogenous factors act to disrupt the metabolism of gonadal hormones during development.
The disruption of cognitive function and various behavioral traits due to EDC exposure has been suspected (Schantz and Widholm 2001) because the development of the central nervous system (CNS) is highly regulated by endogenous hormones directly, including gonadal hormones, and by hormonally regulated events that occur early in development.
Because the surge of gonadal hormones occurs from approximately 8 weeks, along with the process of sexual maturation, we speculate that sensitivity to gonadal hormones might have been changed in our treated mice and thus caused marked changes in aggressive behavior.
Because gonadal hormones can influence differences in responding between males and females in operant behaviors such as lever-pressing, neurotoxicants that disturb the organizational effects of these hormones on brain development could potentially produce enduring performance changes (38).
The brain is particularly sensitive to the differentiating effects of gonadal hormones during a critical period early in development.