Gonfalonier

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Gonfalonier

 

(1) An official of the Italian city-republics during the 13th, 14th, and 15th centuries who headed the militia of the municipal quarters.

(2) A position established in 1289 in Florence called gonfalonier of justice—the head of the detachment guarding the popolano government from the grandees. After 1293 the gonfalonier of justice became the head of government (prior or seignior), but during the period of Medici rule (15th to 18th centuries) he was the city magistrate.

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Certainly Giovanni, having served as Gonfaloniere on three separate occasions and in numerous other offices for the city of Florence, warranted the public honor that burial in the Duomo would signify.
More than a manifestation of decorum, the reference to humility was perhaps necessary in this case because of the lingering suspicion that Salvestro had somehow aided the Ciompi at the time of workers' uprising in 1378, when he was serving as Gonfaloniere di Giustizia.
Giovanni di Conte di Averardo (knight; Gonfaloniere in 1349; married Dea di Boccaccio della Toricella da Siena de' Nobili de' Malcortesi), d.
Salvestro d'Alamanno di Lippo (Knight of the Spron d'oro in 1358; Gonfaloniere in 1370 and 1378; married Bartolommea d'Oddo Altoviti in 1346), d.
Vieri di Cambio di Lippo detto Chiarissimo (knight; Gonfaloniere in 1392; will in 1395; married Bice di misser Pazzino Strozzi in 1378), d.
1420; Gonfaloniere in 1453; married Lena d'Andrea Velluti in 1451), d.
Thus, as a consequence of the loss of Arezzo in 1502, Florence was reorganized, with the provision of a gonfaloniere for life.
While his brother Piero's political career in Florence, especially as gonfaloniere a vita, soon came to an end (Piero fled first to Ragusa and then sought refuge in Rome where Francesco had built up an extensive network of clients and property), his own political and financial savvy were such that he not only survived, bruised but alive, the vicissitudes of Florentine-Roman politics, but was eventually able to re-establish the Soderini clan in Florence.
As Gonfaloniere di Giustizia of Medicean Florence in March-April of 1527, Luigi Guicciardini - older brother of the historian Francesco - was intimately acquainted with political developments in central Italy as Bourbon's troops marched southward.
He discusses the Great Council, the Ottanta, the Gonfaloniere di Giustizia, the chancellery, a vast array of magistracies, courts, and financial institutions along with a smattering of political debates and ideas, especially those of Savonarola and his followers.