Google Answers


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Google Answers

A crowdsourcing venture from Google that began in 2002 and ended in 2006. Users would post questions and a fee they would be willing to pay for the answer, and Google retained 25% of the amount. Any of several hundred Google Answers Researchers (GARs) could answer the question. To qualify as a GAR, people had to fill out an application. Registered users could also comment on questions. See crowdsourcing.
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Google Answers is distinctive in that its entire service and entire employment relationship occur online.
Unfortunately, the demise of Google Answers and the spotty quality of the free human-search services suggest that there isn't a middle ground between quick look-up questions (the last ten winners of the Super Bowl) and high-end analysis (the prospects for biofuels in Brazil).
When I consider the services that Google has recently terminated, I cannot help noticing that most of them did not offer an opportunity for displaying ads--Google Reader, Google Answers, Google Apps, and even Google Labs.
Lively, Google Buzz, Google Video, Google Wave, Google Answers, Google TV, and Google TV 2 are just the abject failures I can list off the top of my head.
She reported that XooxleAnswers is a new service started by David Sarokin, who was a Google Answers researcher.
Question-answering services didn't get a lot of attention until major player Google threw its hat into the ling with Google Answers, recently out of beta.
The claim to subject expertise filters out such popular information offerings as Google Answers, which requires nothing more than that its researchers be 18 or older and reasonably adept at finding information on the Web, as well as numerous other peer-based question-answering sites.
Today, Google answers more than 40 million search queries every day, and international users make up about half of the Google user community.
Later that month, Google announced a new research service called Google Answers that allows users to pay researchers to find answers for them, and then at the beginning of May, they announced an enormous win when AOL chose to forgo Overture and use Google as the AOL internet search engine and also display related advertisements along with the searches (as they do on Google.
Besides existing "Ask a" or experts-on-call services like AskJeeves, it appears that the announcement of your new Google Answers service (http://answers.