Google File System


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Google File System

Google's proprietary method of storing search indexes on disk. It is a distributed file system used in Google's own datacenters, and it is embedded in the Google Search Appliance, which is as a self-contained search device. It is not available as software only.

Computer Clusters and Failsafe
The Google File System (GFS) is designed to run on multiple, standard x86-based servers. It stores data in large chunks that are replicated several times throughout Google's network, and it is designed to withstand any server failing entirely. Master servers store meta-data, while "Chunkservers" store the data files. See Google Search Appliance and Hadoop.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps my perspective is affected by the fact that I worked closely on the underlying Google File System, but I still believe Google's sharp contrast with Yahoo on infrastructure offers powerful lessons about building a sustainable business, especially in the rapidly transforming technology landscape.
Instead of using the latest storage appliances as a foundation, the Google File System used commodity servers to support a flexible and resilient architecture that could solve scalability and resiliency issues once and for all, simplifying and accelerating the future rollout of a wide range of web-scale applications, from maps to cloud storage.
It was inspired by Google's MapReduce and Google File System and cultivated at Yahoo.
The Google File System (GFS) allowed clusters of commodity servers to present their internal disk storage as a unified file system and inspired the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS).
Between 2004 and 2006, Google disclosed details of its Google File System and its MapReduce method.
With Google App Engine, developers can write web applications based on the same building blocks that Google uses, such as the Google File System (GFS) and BigTable (its distributed storage system for structured data).
The Google File System (GFS) and the Parascale Virtual Storage Network (VSN) employ similar architectures," explained Robin Harris of StorageMojo.
The servers will run open source software including the Linux operating system, XEN systems virtualization and Apache's Hadoop project, an open source implementation of Google's published computing infrastructure, specifically MapReduce and the Google File System (GFS).
com engineers contributed to such innovations as the Google File System (smart enough to avoid the message passing that can choke a parallelized system), MapReduce (a framework supporting parallel computations to be shared among Google's server clusters for processing large data sets), Chubby (a record locking and unlocking service that jumped over traditional relational database methods of managing cell and row locks), and other innovations that continue to give Google a performance and cost advantage 10 years after Google opened for business.