Gordimer


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Gordimer

Nadine. born 1923, South African novelist. Her books include The Lying Days (1952), The Conservationist (1974), which won the Booker prize, None to Accompany Me (1994), and The House Gun (1998). Her works were banned in South Africa for their condemnation of apartheid. Nobel prize for literature 1991
References in periodicals archive ?
It would be more than a decade from my first meeting her, that I would physically meet Nadine Gordimer.
Gordimer wrote 15 novels as well as several volumes of short stories, non-fiction and other works, and was published in 40 languages around the world, according to the family statement, which was released by a law firm.
Gordimer had published her first work 'Come Again Tomorrow' when she was only 15, while her last novel, 'No Time Like the Present', was published in 2012.
Like Gordimer, the poets Mihaela Moscaliuc, Sara London, Molly Brodak, and Barbara Claire Freeman have created spaces of destruction in their art, gazing directly and powerfully at subjects that would be easier to avoid.
In The House Gun (1998), Gordimer recuperates the agency and competence of the black lawyer in the figure of Senior Counsel Hamilton Motsamai.
Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, Seamus Heaney, Elfriede Jelinek and over one hundred other authors from every continent, for a worldwide reading of texts by the Chinese author Liao Yiwu on June 4th 2010, the 21st commemorative day of the Tiananmen Square massacre in Beijing.
For Attridge, literary works head off the ready assimilation of the good to some form of political militancy, which has over the years been the tendency of a number of Coetzee's critics, not least Nadine Gordimer (1984) in her infamous review of Life & Times of Michael K.
Other visiting writers over the next few months include new Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy and another Nobel Laureate, Nadine Gordimer.
Nadine Gordimer once wrote that sincerity is never speaking from fixed idea of oneself.
More than a third of the essays in the earlier collection dealt with African authors and topics, but only one essay in the new collection, a study of South Africa's other literary Nobel laureate, Nadine Gordimer, does.
South African writer Nadine Gordimer also focuses on the ramifications of government policies on people and their relationships--in this case, under South Africa's apartheid system.
The shortlist also included: The Siege of Krishnapur by JG Farrell (1973), The Conservationist by Nadine Gordimer (1974), Oscar and Lucinda by Peter Carey (1988), Disgrace by JM Coetzee (1999), and The Ghost Road by Pat Barker (1995).