Gothic architecture

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Gothic architecture

(1050–1530)
A revolutionary style of construction of the High Middle Ages in western Europe which emerged from Romanesque and Byzantine forms. The term “Gothic” was originally applied as one of reproach and contempt. The style was characterized by a delicate balance between the lateral thrust from loads and the force of gravity. It was most often found in cathedrals employing the rib vault, pointed arches, flying buttresses and the gradual reduction of the walls to a system of richly decorated fenestration. The style’s features were height and light, achieved through a mixture of skeletal structures and increasing use of windows. Walls were no longer necessary to support the roof and could be replaced with large, tall windows of stained glass. One of the finest and oldest examples of French Gothic architecture is Notre Dame in Paris.

Gothic architecture

Gothic architecture: vault construction
Gothic architecture: Gothic pier
Gothic architecture: Late type Gothic base, Rouen
Gothic architecture showing construction of a Gothic church, illustrating principles of isolated supports and buttressing
The architectural style of the High Middle Ages in Western Europe, which emerged from Romanesque and Byzantine forms in France during the later 12th cent. Its great works are cathedrals, characterized by the pointed arch, the rib vault, the development of the exterior flying buttress, and the gradual reduction of the walls to a system of richly decorated fenestration. Gothic architecture lasted until the 16th cent., when it was succeeded by the classical forms of the Renaissance. In France and Germany one speaks of the Early, High, and Late Gothic; the French middle phase is referred to as Rayonnant, the late phase as Flamboyant. In English architecture the usual divisions are Early English, Decorated, and Perpendicular.
References in periodicals archive ?
The gothic cathedral is a spectacular achievement of the European Middle Ages.
Here, as with the temple of Venus, the narrator uses the Gothic architectural nomenclature to describe elements within the house of Fame that are found in Gothic cathedrals.
The mightiest works of art and architecture, from the towering Gothic cathedrals of the high Middle Ages to the soaring music of Bach and Handel, were all the products of men seeking to glorify God by fulfilling the highest human impulses.
As to coherent facade designs, which are so often associated with the great northern Gothic cathedrals, only those of Siena and Orvieto contain wonderful contemporary assemblages.
One of the things Simmel noticed in Romanesque and Gothic cathedrals was the narrowing of the openings as you move toward the door.
The film will take you on a tour from Brittany to the Mediterranean Sea, and give you the opportunity to gawk at Gothic cathedrals, the French Alps, the countryside of Champagne and, of course, the Eiffel Tower and Notre Dame in Paris.
The series begins with French Gothic cathedrals of the twelfth century and ends with Latin-American painting of the twentieth century.
Instead of trying to replace the posts, Herbst designed a system of freestanding trellises that work like the flying buttresses of Gothic cathedrals to hold the fence upright (while also serving as multidimensional supports for vines).
Featuring a wide variety of images that range from Gothic cathedrals to the Burning Man festival, the photographs represent places with tremendous symbolic and spiritual potential.
Winchester''s major landmark is Winchester Cathedral, one of the largest cathedrals in Europe, with the distinction of having the longest nave and overall length of all Gothic cathedrals in Europe.
Distinguished by elaborate exterior details--steep gables, pointed arches, diamond-paned windows, scrollwork ornamentation, and big porches--the style is rooted in the Gothic cathedrals of medieval Europe.