Collegiate Gothic

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Related to Gothic Revival architecture: Early Gothic Revival, Gothic Revival style

Collegiate Gothic

A term for the version of Gothic architecture that was characteristic of the colleges at Oxford and Cambridge, England, and adapted as the style for a number of American colleges in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Collegiate Gothic

Collegiate Gothic
A secular version of Gothic architecture, characteristic of the older colleges of Oxford and Cambridge. Adopted in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by a number of other colleges in other countries.
References in periodicals archive ?
Oakfield Street - the street contains a mix of classical and Gothic Revival architecture.
All Saints is a starkly impressive building consecrated in 1887 and a fine example of Gothic Revival architecture with an interior featuring some excellent Victorian wood carving.
The more prosaic article by Ian Lochhead on the mid-19th century translation of Gothic revival architecture from Britain to colonial New Zealand might have done better duty in this position, or a chapter on local gothic literature perhaps, commissioned specifically for the volume.
A Grade II Listed building, the Hall is one of the country's finest examples of Victorian Gothic Revival architecture and features 52 opulent rooms and stunning gardens.
Colman's Cathedral is "a most important example of 19th-century Gothic revival architecture .
STANACRES is a Grade II listed property and a fine example of Gothic revival architecture.
The second day saw Chitrakar wearily walking past the soaring Gothic Revival architecture of Victoria Terminus and spending a lazy afternoon in the leafy environs of Oval Maidan--a cricket field used by schoolboys and street urchins alike.
Andrew's gothic revival architecture makes it a downtown Fort Worth landmark.
The gentlemen architect is known for his Gothic revival architecture.
Gothic revival architecture, majestic panelings and fabrics and historically significant artwork and memorabilia were personally culled throughout Tigrett's lifetime of world travel as founder of the internationally acclaimed Hard Rock Cafe and House of Blues empires.