Graeco-Roman


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Graeco-Roman

(esp US), Greco-Roman
1. of, characteristic of, or relating to Greek and Roman influences, as found in Roman sculpture
2. denoting a style of wrestling in which the legs may not be used to obtain a fall and no hold may be applied below the waist
References in periodicals archive ?
Cribiore (Writing, Teachers, and Students in Graeco-Roman Egypt [Atlanta: Scholars Press, 19961; Gymnastics of the Mind: Greek Education in Hellenistic and Roman Egypt [Princeton: Princeton Univ.
Contributors present interconnected studies of some of the most important moments and figures in the history of the comic genre and its reception from Graeco-Roman times to the present.
Guy MacLean Rogers, classicist and historian of Greek and Roman history, is the author of Alexander: The Ambiguity of Greatness (Random House, 2004) and The Mysteries of Artemis of Ephesos: Cult, Polis and Change in the Graeco-Roman World (Yale, 2013).
The Mysteries of Artemis of Ephesos: Cult, Polis, and Change in the Graeco-Roman World, by Guy Maclean Rogers.
The bronze medals were won in weightlifting by Nadia Hosni (58 Kg) in Snatch (84 Kg) and Clean and Jerk (100 Kg), in fencing by Azza Besbes in sword and in Graeco-Roman wrestling by Haykel Achouri (84 kg).
For many of the themes covered, essays are arranged in pairs with one essay covering Pharaonic practice and a second essay covering the Graeco-Roman period.
However, the Greek belles-lettres also developed a hostile tradition, even if it was never as prominent in the Graeco-Roman literature as the idealising tradition.
Even if its origins cannot be traced to Greek civilisation, Europe was still 'forcefully and lastingly influenced by Graeco-Roman antiquity'.
The chapter ends with the Vivarium, a monastery founded in 538 by Cassiodorus, who "foresaw that with the collapse of political institutions monasteries would play an important part in preserving the Graeco-Roman tradition.
One of the essayists, the late John Boswell, pointed out that homosexuality was accepted in the Graeco-Roman world.
The concept that tumour formation was part of the inflammatory process involving a 'flux of humours' and resulting in the formation of localised growths or swellings in regions of the body, was postulated by Hippocrates in approximately the 5th century BC, and changed little during the next millennium up to the end of Graeco-Roman antiquity.
It also has monuments that can be dated to the Graeco-Roman and Ptolemaic eras.