Graffiti

(redirected from Graffiti culture)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Graffiti

Handwriting recognition software for the Newton and Zoomer which recognises symbols that aren't necessarily letters. This gives greater speed and accuracy. It was written by Berkeley Softworks.

Graffiti

The designs resulting from painting words or symbols on a building, wall or other object.

Graffiti

 

dedicatory, magical, and everyday inscriptions on buildings, walls, metallic articles, vessels, and the like.

Graffiti are found in great quantity during the excavation of ancient and medieval cities and settlements in many countries of the world. They are found on almost all ancient Russian buildings; those in the cathedrals of St. Sophia in Kiev and Novgorod are especially interesting. Graffiti supplement the information gained from paleography and add to the research of the little-studied colloquial aspect of the language of an ancient people.

REFERENCES

Tolstoi, I. I. Grecheskie graffiti drevnikh gorodov Severnogo Prichernomor’ia. Moscow-Leningrad, 1953.
Vysotskii, S. A. Drevnerusskie nadpisi Sofii Kievskoi XI-XIV vv., vol. 1. Kiev, 1966.
References in periodicals archive ?
Whether actual physical violence is a part of graffiti culture is an area of contention, and no doubt where graffiti(ed) masculinities intersect with gang life, actual physical violence is bound to increase.
Class is another important paradigm for understanding graffiti culture.
Successful masculinities operating in graffiti culture involve the manly cogito: I risk therefore I am.
This is similar to what happens with the formation of crews in graffiti culture.
Repressive masculine roles that impoverish men from expressing "feminine" traits are challenged by graffiti culture.
It is inevitable that the current wave of skate- and surf-influenced fashion, which draws from street art and graffiti culture, will make its influence felt in home furnishings.
Graffiti culture epitomizes hybridization, subversion, and community.
Allegedly inspired by the New York graffiti culture of the 1970s and the student-led Nazi-resistance White Rose Movement, Martin (although you wouldn't know this unless somebody told you) weaves together a functional love story about two young lovers falling in and out of love and trying to stick it to the proverbial man with big, bombastic anthems.
Brian Mark, defending, said Hemmel had at the time been "obsessed" with the graffiti culture and did not see his actions as an anti-social crime.
Paul Caulfield, defending, said Kaszefko had become involved in the graffiti culture in a limited way through "boredom" more than anything else and now lived a crime-free life.