Grain Forming

Grain Forming

 

the process, prior to ripening, by which grain is formed. During this process organic matter accumulates rapidly and the water content simultaneously decreases. The grain quickly grows larger and acquires a smooth surface, a fresh coloring, and good physical and yield properties. If water and nutrients are abundant and temperatures are normal, the process of grain forming is fairly lengthy—for example, 10–20 days for winter wheat. Dry winds greatly reduce and may halt grain forming, resulting in meager grain; rainy weather prolongs the period of grain forming. Lodging, disease, and pest damage also adversely affect grain forming. Correct tillage, fertilization, and other scientific farming techniques promote good grain forming.

References in periodicals archive ?
Also, reduction of grain forming under deficit water affected by decrease of transforming photosynthesis materials and amount of reserved assimilation resulted in enhancing damage.
Ali Asghar a middle class farmer complained that there was shortfall of fertilizers during the grain forming period of the wheat crop but still the crop is very healthy.