Grain Separator

Grain Separator

 

a machine for removing dust and foreign matter from grain, for removing the husks from the products of the processing of crops, and for checking the quality of the hulled product, by-products, and hulls. Grain separators are divided into two groups.

In separators of the first group, which operate with a variable amount of air, grain is fed into the separator by a feeder roller and is regulated by valves and counterweights. The setting of the valve is determined by screws. In the separator passages, particles that are more prone to blow away are carried off and settle in a chamber, from which they drop out as they accumulate. In separators of the second group, which operate with a constant amount of air, the grain falls in an even layer through a tube of the working chamber and a valve onto a movable deflecting panel and from it into an outlet channel, undergoing two blowing processes en route. The impurities picked up by the airflow pass along the aspiration duct into the settling chamber, from which they are removed by a worm conveyor. The air enters the suction intake of the fan, which feeds it to the opening of the working chamber for repeated blowing.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
They had a Case steam engine, a 42-inch wooden Goodson grain separator, a Papec ensilage cutter, a buzz saw and a Birdsell clover huller.
Two steam traction engine and grain separator manufacturers in one town: rare, indeed.
was owned by Frederick Strobel, who worked with Huber to produce an early grain separator, and who would later be a major player in the development and manufacture of the Leader separator line.
We were all acquainted with (how) the grain separator separated the wheat from the straw, and (how) the fanning mill separated weed seeds from the wheat, but we could not even imagine how a machine could separate cream from the milk.
Banting produced its own harvesting machines, such as the grain separator, but it also had a long history of using other manufacturers' equipment, improving on it and selling it under the Greyhound name.
where he designed a grain separator that Huber manufactured and marketed.
A massive leather belt transmitted the steam engine's power to the grain separator.
It came with a 28-48 Red River Special grain separator (the only way Whitman would sell the tractor to Mildred was with the separator).
Since development loans for the farm sector are often used to purchase tractors, tubewells, trolleys, power generators, wheat thrashers, grain separators and other equipment and machinery, low lending for development effectively impedes farm mechanisation.
In the late 1800s, steam-powered "traction machines" gained acceptance, powering plows and providing belt power for grain separators.
With the advent of heavy farm wagons, grain separators and steam traction engines, the need for a heavier jack became evident.
The firm decided up front that its trucks would be most useful to farmers during the harvest season, so they included a large belt pulley that could be attached to the front crank shaft for powering grain separators and other belt-driven machines.