grand tour

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Related to Grand Tourist: Grand Tour of Europe

grand tour

(formerly) an extended tour through the major cities of Europe, esp one undertaken by a rich or aristocratic Englishman to complete his education
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Starting with the earliest 17th century travellers in Northern Italy, charting the high point of the Tour in the 18th century in Rome and Naples, then working his way through Sicily, Ancient Greece and Turkey and ending with the last Grand Tourists of the early 19th century in the Alps (before the railway made tourism available to the masses), Kevin will chart how each age pursued both the sacred and the profane in their travels abroad.
But what Cromwell was doing here vandalising Royal collections was to some extent mirrored later in Italy when leading Italian families began to lose their competitive edge and, by the early years of the 18th century were selling off their treasures to early Grand Tourists visiting Italy from England.
According to the final illustration given on page 55 of this fascinating book, a copy of which should be on every collectors bookshelf, we can believe that the Baron dealt in marble statuary, books (prints or original drawings) coins, medals and gems, not to mention bronzes and all the rest of the things which appeal to grand tourists.
Where this book excels is in looking beyond the grand tourists and artists in order to uncover the networks of mediators--fixers, brokers, and buyers--who brought continental art to England in the early 17th century.
Piranesi (1720-1778) is probably best known for his etchings of modern and ancient Rome, produced for the Grand Tourists of his age, but his series of Imaginary Prisons are probably his most striking works.
These were not the Grand Tourists, supposedly adding the final gilding to their classical education; neither were they their country cousins, avid for the Picturesque, who would write and draw their way around the beauty spots of England, Scotland and Wales.
For sightseers, often English Grand Tourists wanting to extend their journeys, the Bernese 'Three Sisters' would in time become truly iconic, being portrayed by artists as diverse as Ferdinand Hodler and Emil Nolde.
To celebrate the turn of the millennium, the Laing Art Gallery in Newcastle held an exhibition concerning Grand Tourists from the North of England.
Clement presided over a cosmopolitan and intellectually active city, where foreign artists and grand tourists were welcome.
Its nine sections, which are organised thematically by the curators, Carlo Sisi and Riccardo Spinelli, tell us about the final years of baroque art made for Cosimo m, followed by a section on the next generation of artists; about artists invited to Florence from other Italian cities, such as Bologna, Venice and Genoa, by Cosimo's son Grand Prince Ferdinando; about depictions of classical and mythological themes in the new rococo taste and in new media; about historical painting and sacred art; about caricatures of eccentrics and fools, of bizarre or unusual scenes, and of the lower orders of society; about landscape painting and the vedute that were snapped up by so many Grand Tourists (Fig.
Her discussion of the 'Cachet of the Copy' (whereby the covetous grand tourists took home casts of the finest classical sculptures to make them part of their own surroundings) continues the pioneering work of Malcolm Baker and Nicholas Penny, and the arguments first posited by Penny with Francis Haskell in Taste and the Antique (1981).

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