microlensing

(redirected from Gravitational microlensing)
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microlensing

(mÿ -kroh-lenz-ing) See Einstein cross; gravitational lens.

microlensing

[′mī·krō‚lenz·iŋ]
(astronomy)
A phenomenon in which a foreground star acts as a gravitational lens when it happens to pass in front of a background star, causing the background starlight to brighten and bend through a ring-shaped region.
References in periodicals archive ?
Individual stars can also lens light, although this effect, called gravitational microlensing, is much more subtle and can only be detected by measuring how the lensing effect increases the source's brightness.
Astronomers at the University of Auckland used a technique called gravitational microlensing, currently used by a Japan-New Zealand collaboration called MOA (Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics) at New Zealand's Mt John Observatory.
The strategy uses a technique called gravitational microlensing, currently used by a Japan-New Zealand collaboration called MOA (Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics) at New Zealand's Mt.
Astronomers for the first time detected gravitational microlensing (136: 375).
In order to find planets similar to the planets from our own solar system, researchers used a third method - gravitational microlensing observations, which require very special conditions concerning the stars location in the galaxy.
The evidence, which enables the mass to be determined highly accurately, is based upon so-called gravitational microlensing and requires the highest technical standards available.
London, June 11 (ANI: A team of scientists has used gravitational microlensing to come up with a tentative detection of the first extragalactic exoplanet in Andromeda, our nearest large galactic neighbour.
To find such star systems, nearly a hundred scientists joined forces as part of the Microlensing Follow-Up Network, or MicroFUN, to scour the galaxy using a technique called gravitational microlensing.
But in gravitational microlensing we don't even look at the light from the star-planet system.
Their technique, called gravitational microlensing, takes advantage of chance alignments between stars.
In addition, I briefly discuss the next step in observational asteroseismology: the SONG network which is designed to make ground-based velocity observations of stellar oscillations, and detect exoplanets from gravitational microlensing, from 7-8 nodes suitably distributed around the world.
8-meter) telescope at Mount John University Observatory in New Zealand is used to regularly scan the copious stars at the center of our galaxy for gravitational microlensing events.