gravitational redshift

(redirected from Gravitational red shift)

gravitational redshift

(Einstein shift) The redshift of spectral lines that occurs when radiation, including light, is emitted from a massive body. In order to ‘climb out’ of the body's gravitational field, the radiation must lose energy. The radiation frequency must therefore decrease and its wavelength λ, shift by δλ toward a greater value. The redshift is given by
δλ/λ = Gm /c 2r

G is the gravitational constant, m and r the mass and radius of the massive body, and c is the speed of light. Gravitational redshift was predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity and although extremely small has been detected, for example, in the spectra of the Sun and several white dwarfs. The redshift of the Earth's gravitational field has been determined very accurately using beams of radiation traveling upward through a tall building. Predicted and measured values agree very closely.

gravitational redshift

[‚grav·ə′tā·shən·əl ′red ‚shift]
(relativity)
A displacement of spectral lines toward the red when the gravitational potential at the observer of the light is greater than at its source.
References in periodicals archive ?
One might characterize at least part of the effect as due to a larger and larger gravitational red shift, or decrease in W-wave frequencies, as the plant part's angle decreases with respect to the gravitational field.
Bayramov unveils the universal gravitational flow as the root cause for gravity and the gravitational red shift and lensing effects, confirmed in the 1919 Solar Eclipse test of General Relativity.
This manifests itself as a gravitational red shift in the wavelengths of spectral lines [1].