Great Ice Age


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Related to Great Ice Age: Glacial age

Great Ice Age

[¦grāt ′īs ‚āj]
(geology)
The Pleistocene epoch.
References in periodicals archive ?
Intending to speak on his speciality (fossil fish) he gave a hastily written lecture in which he set out an audacious theory of a catastrophic Great Ice Age.
The Malverns is a range of hilltops created during the last great ice age.
During the last great ice age, wooly mammoths, wild horses, musk oxen, caribou, and a host of other creatures migrated from Asia across the Bering Land Bridge to the place we now know as Alaska.
In the years immediately following 1872 this was done by Sir Charles Lyell in the fourth edition of The antiquity of man (1873); by James Geikie in his Great ice age (1874); and by W.
Tony Mitchell-Jones, mammals specialist for Natural England, said: "Like badgers, foxes and red squirrels, pine martens have been here continuously since the last great Ice Age and were once common in our woods and forests.
BOSTON - The Great Ice Age that has frozen the Bruins' offense dead in its tracks entered its 23rd day today, and the forecast was .
The majority of the gene pool of the British Isles is very ancient and dates to the era after the last great Ice Age.
At its heart is Kilmartin Glen, an area carved out by the last great ice age, with steep-sided valleys and diverse landscape.
Since then, we've had the great Ice Age scare of the 1970s, and the predicted end of electricity through the imminent exhaustion of world copper supplies.
Commenting on the already-evident cooling trend in the same article, he mentioned that "Reid Bryson of the University of Wisconsin points out that the earth's average temperature during the great Ice Ages was only about 7 degrees lower than during its warmer eras--and that the present decline has taken the planet about a sixth of the way toward the Ice Age average.
Archaeological evidence indicates that vast forests covered the islands before the great ice ages.
They said the sediments date to the Sturtian glaciation some 700 million years ago, one of two great ice ages of the Cryogenian period associated with the 'Snowball Earth' hypothesis.