magnum opus

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magnum opus

a great work of art or literature, esp the greatest single work of an artist
References in classic literature ?
Goldsmith's last great work was a comedy named She Stoops to Conquer.
A great work, which deserved to remain unique, the last originality of architecture, the signature of a giant artist at the bottom of the colossal register of stone which was closed forever.
Casaubon's mind, seeing reflected there in vague labyrinthine extension every quality she herself brought; had opened much of her own experience to him, and had understood from him the scope of his great work, also of attractively labyrinthine extent.
It would be my duty to study that I might help him the better in his great works.
Then, quite naturally, the conversation fell upon the great work that none should be too busy to think of, and which few are too young or too poor to help on with their mite.
Not till long afterward did Polly see how much good this little effort had done her, for the first small sacrifice of this sort leads the way to others, and a single hand's turn given heartily to the world's great work helps one amazingly with one's own small tasks.
Yes, he said, and he will have done a great work before he departs.
Did you ever see an artist effect great works with an unworthy tool?
Henceforward, you must have courtiers who know how to amuse you - madmen who will get themselves killed to carry out what you call your great works.
The building of these great works and cities will give a starvation ration to millions of common laborers, for the enormous bulk of the surplus will compel an equally enormous expenditure, and the oligarchs will build for a thousand years--ay, for ten thousand years.
These great works will be the form their expenditure of the surplus will take, and in the same way that the ruling classes of Egypt of long ago expended the surplus they robbed from the people by the building of temples and pyramids.
Those great works of his have the calm of the sublime; but here, notwithstanding beauty, was something troubling.