vessel

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vessel

1. a passenger or freight-carrying ship, boat, etc.
2. an aircraft, esp an airship
3. Anatomy a tubular structure that transports such body fluids as blood and lymph
4. Botany a tubular element of xylem tissue consisting of a row of cells in which the connecting cell walls have broken down

Vessel

 

(also trachea), in plants, a conducting element of xylem that consists of a long hollow tube formed by a single row of cells (vessel members) perforated on their transverse walls. Vessels are characteristic of angiosperms (except for certain Polycarpicae [Trochodendron, drimys] and Liliaceae [lily of the valley, dracena, agave]); they also occur in some ferns (Pleridium), selaginella, Equisetum, and Gneticae (ephedra, Gnetum, Welwitschia).

Vessels may be annular, helical, scalariform, or pitted, depending on the structures of their lateral walls. In annular and helical vessels the secondary membrane resembles rings or twisted ribbons. The vessels arise in the early stages of the development of plant organs and are capable of extension. Scalariform and pitted vessels with larger deposits of secondary membrane and bordered pits in the walls are formed in organs that have finished growing lengthwise. After the lignification of the membranes, the cell protoplasts die and the cavity of the vessel fills with water.

Primitive vessels were characterized by great length (reaching 1.3 mm) and small diameter; the lateral walls were marked by scalariform porosity (tulip tree), and the angular cross section of vessel members had scalariform perforations on sloped transverse walls. Highly specialized vessels are composed of short vessel members that in cross section are rounded and have a wide opening (reaching 0.5 mm in diameter). The vessel members have simple perforations on the transverse walls and small alternate pits on the lateral walls (ash, oak).

L. I. LOTOVA

What does it mean when you dream about a vessel?

A vessel in a dream may be the container that holds the dreamer’s valuables. The size and the condition of the vessel—e.g., old and tarnished or new and shiny—may indicate if these are established ideals or things newly acquired. Vessels can also be containers of the self.

vessel

[′ves·əl]
(botany)
A water-conducting tube or duct in the xylem.
(engineering)
A container or structural envelope in which materials are processed, treated, or stored; for example, pressure vessels, reactor vessels, agitator vessels, and storage vessels (tanks).
(naval architecture)
Any craft that can carry people or cargo over the surface of the water.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the blade used for incision in open laparoscopy has also been known to cause great vessel injury.
A new technique for complete correction of transposition of the great vessels.
Finally, subcutaneous emphysema occurs from dissection of air from the confounds of the visceral space to the periphery, such as is the case with a pneumomediastinum tracking cephalad around the great vessels of the neck (Figure 4).
Our approach achieved the goal of performing a minimally invasive procedure within the accepted standards for the surgical management of an abscess medial to the great vessels.
Coleman strongly discourages placing the patient in Trendelenburg's position during trocar insertion because it moves her great vessels closer to the abdominal wall and in direct line of the trocar unless more obtuse angulation is planned to skirt the sacral promontory.
In such a case, an external approach would provide better exposure and allow for control over the great vessels and regional cranial nerves.
PET-CT scans of the great vessels of the chest and neck will measure the level of inflammation within atherosclerotic plaques, which is known to trigger vessel occlusion.
Both great vessels were arising from the right ventricle, which was communicated with hypoplastic left ventricle via a subaortic ventricular septal defect (VSD).
The presence of a cervical rib displaces the great vessels that cross the thoracic outlet superiorly and proceed into the neck.