Grecian urn

Grecian urn

lovers depicted on it will be forever young. [Br. Poetry: Keats “Ode on a Grecian Urn”]
References in classic literature ?
The Ode on a Grecian Urn is more lovely now than when it was written, because for a hundred years lovers have read it and the sick at heart taken comfort in its lines.
Here are some verses from his ode On a Grecian Urn.
His Romantic glow and emotion never fade or cool, but such poems as the Odes to the Nightingale and to a Grecian Urn, and the fragment of 'Hyperion,' are absolutely flawless and satisfying in structure and expression.
Now, there is a Grecian urn erected in the centre of a lonely field; now there is a woman weeping at a tomb; now a very commonplace old gentleman in a white waistcoat, with a thumb thrust into each arm-hole of his coat; now a student poring on a book; now a crouching negro; now, a horse, a dog, a cannon, an armed man; a hunch-back throwing off his cloak and stepping forth into the light.
X leaves cryptic clues alluding to Plato's Republic and John Keats's Ode to a Grecian Urn, eventually stranding Gloria, Cloe, Calvin, and the Mad Hatter (Mason) in a tomb under haunted McGrath Hall.
If your garden is your sanctuary where you like to escape and dream of sunnier climes, the gentle babble of flowing water from an upturned Grecian urn should transport you to your favourite holiday destination.
All that for the preservation of a Grecian urn that carries $560 billion in public and private debt.
In trying to understand what he is doing I wish to return to the Grecian Urn.
At the same time, I want to keep in play this religious-aesthetic binary, for the illumination which, I believe, it eventually brings, via "Toccata," to the reading of "Ode on a Grecian Urn.
And then came the odes, the greatest odes that English has to offer: to Psyche, to a Nightingale, on a Grecian Urn, on Melancholy, to Indolence.
But he accepts, however, that you're unlikely to come across a semi-naked image of your gran on a Grecian urn.
In writing his "Ode on a Grecian Urn," Keats seems to be meditating on "The Phoenix and Turtle" almost to the extent that he is, within the fiction of the ode, contemplating an urn.