Greed


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Greed

See also Stinginess.
Almayer’s Folly
lust for gold leads to decline. [Br. Lit.: Almayer’s Folly]
Alonso
Shakespearean symbol of avarice. [Br. Lit.: The Tempest]
Béline
fans husband’s hypochondria to get his money. [Fr. Lit.: Le Malade Imaginaire]
Barak’s wife
agrees to sell shadow, symbol of her fertility. [Aust. Opera: R. Strauss, Woman Without a Shadow, Westerman, 432]
Brown, Joe
turns in partner Joe Christmas for reward money. [Am. Lit.: Light in August]
Common Lot, The
the get-rich-quick club. [Am. Lit.: The Common Lot, Hart, 369]
Crawley, Pitt
inherits, marries, and hoards money. [Br. Lit.: Vanity Fair]
Eugénie Grandet
wealth as raison d’être. [Fr. Lit.: Eugenie Grandet, Magill I, 258–260]
Financier, The
riches as raison d’être. [Am. Lit.: The Financier, Magill I, 280–282]
Gehazi
behind master’s back, takes money he declined. [O.T.: II Kings 5:21–22]
Griffiths, Clyde
insatiable desire for wealth causes his downfall. [Am. Lit.: An American Tragedy]
Hoard, Walkadine
hastily marries courtesan posing as wealthy widow. [Br. Lit.: A Trick to Catch the Old One]
Kibroth-hattaavah
Hebrew place name: where greedy were buried. [O.T.: Numbers, 11:33–35]
Lucre, Pecunious
duped into succoring profligate nephew by lure of a fortune. [Br. Lit.: A Trick To Catch the Old One]
Mammon
avaricious fallen angel. [Br. Lit.: Paradise Lost]
Mammon, Sir Epicure
avaricious knight; seeks philosopher’s stone for Midas touch. [Br. Lit.: The Alchemist]
Mansion, The
shows material advantages of respectability winning over kinship. [Am. Lit.: The Mansion, Hart, 520]
Midas
greedy king whose touch turned everything to gold. [Classical Myth.: Bulfinch, 42–44]
Montgomery
mercenary chief proverbially kept for himself all the booty. [Fr. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 618]
Naboth’s Vineyard
another’s possession gotten, by hook or crook. [O.T.: I Kings, 21]
New Grub Street
place of ruthless contest among moneymongers. [Br. Lit.: New Grub Street, Magill I, 647–649]
Osmond, Gilbert
marries Isabel Archer for her money. [Am. Lit.: The Portrait of a Lady, Magill I, 766–768]
Overreach, Sir Giles
grasping usurer, unscrupulous and ambitious. [Br. Lit.: A New Way to Pay Old Debts, Wheeler, 275]
Pardoner’s Tale
three brothers kill each other for treasure. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Pardoner’s Tale”]
pig
medieval symbol of avarice. [Art: Hall, 247]
Putnam, Abbie
marries old man in anticipation of inheritance. [Am. Lit.: Desire Under the Elms]
Scrooge, Ebenezer
byword for greedy miser. [Br. Lit.: A Christmas Carol]
Sisyphus
condemned to impossible task for his avarice. [Gk. Myth.: Wheeler, 1011]
References in classic literature ?
And a very horror of turning to him again in mere need of greed set the seal on my first angry resolution.
Upon getting back to the car, he found it burdened with the quartz-blocks that Joe's greed had heaped in it.
In them, too, was greed for the toothsome dainty the boy carried.
For thus men sometimes overreach themselves through greed and guile.
He had a very distinct and intense vision of his chief good, the vigorous greed which he had inherited having taken a special form by dint of circumstance: and his chief good was to be a moneychanger.
Probably he reasoned that with my greed for all manner of literature the bad would become known to me along with the good at any rate, and I had better know that he knew it.
He hated the shams and the hypocrisies of it and with the clear vision of an unspoiled mind he had penetrated to the rotten core of the heart of the thing--the cowardly greed for peace and ease and the safe-guarding of property rights.
Jealousy and greed alone might have been sufficient to prompt Numa to drive Sheeta away, even though the lion was not sufficiently hungry to devour the flesh that he thus wrested from the lesser cat; but then, too, there was in the little brain within the massive head a sense of loyalty, and perhaps this it was that sent Numa quickly forward, growling, toward the spitting Sheeta.
Here he was received with suspicion and unfriendliness by the native chief, who, like all those who came in contact with Rokoff or Paulvitch, had suffered in some manner from the greed, the cruelty, or the lust of the two Muscovites.
The great chest in the bottom of Rajah Muda Saffir's prahu had awakened in other hearts as well as his, blind greed and avarice; so that as it had been the indirect cause of his disaster it now proved the incentive to another to turn the mishap to his own profit, and to the final undoing of the Malay.
But the fresh meat was strong in Baseek's nostrils, and greed urged him to take a bite of it.
If I do not conceal myself, he may be reminded to write something disagreeable about my lack of a crest or my appetite for scrap- iron; and although he is inexpressibly brilliant when he devotes himself to censure of folly and greed, his dulness is matchless when he transcends the limits of legitimate comment.