Septuagint

(redirected from Greek Bible)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Greek Bible: Hebrew Bible

Septuagint

(sĕp`tyo͞oəjĭnt) [Lat.,=70], oldest extant Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible made by Hellenistic Jews, possibly from Alexandria, c.250 B.C. Legend, according to the fictional letter of Aristeas, records that it was done in 72 days by 72 translators for Ptolemy Philadelphus, which accounts for the name. The Greek form was later improved and altered to include the books of the Apocrypha and some of the pseudepigrapha. It was the version used by Hellenistic Jews and the Greek-speaking Christians, including St. Paul; it is still used in the Greek Church. The Septuagint is of importance to critics because it is translated from texts now lost. No copy of the original translation exists; textual difficulties abound. The symbol for the Septuagint is LXX.

Septuagint

the principal Greek version of the Old Testament, including the Apocrypha, believed to have been translated by 70 or 72 scholars
References in periodicals archive ?
Because many of the anonymous women on Jesus' journey to recognition are afflicted, illness emerges as a generic feminine characteristic in the Greek Bible.
The title might suggest to the unwary that in ancient times one could drop in at a bookseller and buy a codex containing such a collection, or that these collected texts have the kind of relationship to the canonical New Testament that the overplus of the Greek Bible had to the Hebrew Bible - the overplus to which St Jerome gave the name `Apocrypha' or secret books, though there was nothing secret about them.
In a slightly revised version of his 2009 doctoral dissertation at Wheaten College, Mihalios (New Testament, Greek Bible College, Greece) demonstrates how the eschatology of the Old Testament Book of Daniel influenced the notion of the hour the coming of which no one knows in the Gospel of John.
Translation and Survival: The Greek Bible of the Ancient Jewish Diaspora, by Tessa Rajak.
Wright recently suggested that New Testament scholars ought to spend an hour each day reading the Fathers, and patrologists an hour each day reading the Greek Bible.
Since so much in Hendel's book depends upon indirect evidence from Greek, it really demands a rare mastery of the intricacies of the Greek Bible.
It is achieved partly by hiving off the Greek Bible translations (the Editor underestimates the role of translator as interpreter), the Alexandrian Jewish interpreters, the apocryphal writings, and Josephus to an introductory section, where they become part of the prehistory of Christian interpretation, and partly by giving no place whatever to archaeology, epigraphy, and iconography, which, in the absence of written texts, give us almost our only real clues about non-rabbinic interpretation in the Christian period.
The legend that Jewish scholars introduced changes when translated the Septuagint into Greek, was invented by the Rabbis around the turn of the first century CE, they argue, but within a century or so it provided Christian writers with proof for the inspiration of their texts of the Greek Bible, and perhaps fueled the claim that Jews had hidden prophecies of the coming messiah.
Since her focus is the Septuagint, she aims to "give priority to studies directly concerned with the Septuagint" and "studies relating to the Greek Bible in a more indirect way have also been mentioned whenever possible" (pp.
These include observations on the text of Phocylides' Greek Bible, the interconnected triads of cardinal sins in Judaism (idolatry, sexual immorality, murder) and in Christianity (idolatry, sexual immorality, greed), and the concept of unwritten laws.
Mistaken, maybe, but not "fatuous," considering that the patriarchal survey and anti-temple sentiments of the speech cannot fit seamlessly into Luke's Greek Bible or his theology of history.
The last of the first series of lectures then focuses on one particular text of the Greek Bible, namely, the so-called Lucianic or Antiochene text, a text reconstructed for Samuel-Kings by Fernandez and others at an earlier stage of investigation.

Full browser ?