Septuagint

(redirected from Greek Old Testament)
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Septuagint

(sĕp`tyo͞oəjĭnt) [Lat.,=70], oldest extant Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible made by Hellenistic Jews, possibly from Alexandria, c.250 B.C. Legend, according to the fictional letter of Aristeas, records that it was done in 72 days by 72 translators for Ptolemy Philadelphus, which accounts for the name. The Greek form was later improved and altered to include the books of the Apocrypha and some of the pseudepigrapha. It was the version used by Hellenistic Jews and the Greek-speaking Christians, including St. Paul; it is still used in the Greek Church. The Septuagint is of importance to critics because it is translated from texts now lost. No copy of the original translation exists; textual difficulties abound. The symbol for the Septuagint is LXX.

Septuagint

the principal Greek version of the Old Testament, including the Apocrypha, believed to have been translated by 70 or 72 scholars
References in periodicals archive ?
On the pages of this in this motivated and moving rendition Reid has chosen 84 stimulating works to give special attention through paraphrase and/or translation of the Greek Old Testament.
The Septuagint As Christian Scripture: Its Prehistory And The Problem Of Its Canon by Martin Hengel (Professor Emertius of New Testament and Ancient Judaism, Univerity of Tubingen) is a scholarly analysis of the Greek Old Testament, also known as the Septuagint, and the history of its consolidation and inclusion into both Judaic and Christian canonical texts.
Jerome, who in the early 5th century distinguished the Hebrew and Greek Old Testaments, stating that books not found in the Hebrew were not received as canonical.