Carcinus maenas

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Carcinus maenas

[¦kär·sən·əs ′mī·nəs]
(invertebrate zoology)
A decapod crustacean commonly found on the coasts of northwest Europe and the northeast United States that feeds on invertebrates such as mollusks, polychaete worms, and other crustaceans, and periodically sheds its exoskeleton in order to grow. Also known as shore crab.
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In contrast, the European green crab has long been recognized as a menace to marine systems (SN: 6/13/98, p.
Other crab species were caught in much smaller numbers and included the Atlantic rock crab Cancer irroratus, the European green crab Carcinus maenas, Say's mud crab Dyspanopeus sayi, and the fiddler crab Uca pugnax.
KEY WORDS: Carcinus maenas, Cancer magister, claw morphology, prey consumption, feeding rates, mechanical advantage, Mytilus trossulus, Ostrea lurida, green crab, Dungeness crab
With the green crab on the West Coast, we are witnessing a truly astounding event," says Armand M.
East meets West: competitive interactions between green crab Carcinus maenas, and native and introduced shore crab Hemigrapsus spp.
The potential for green crab to disrupt ecosystem structure outside its native range is well established (Cohen et al.
KEY WORDS: green crab, Carcinus maenas, northern distribution, population, reproduction, ovigerous females, gonadosomatic analysis, fecundity, mating, size at maturity
Efforts to deter predators using plastic netting have been used recently; however, when the exotic European green crab, Carcinus maenas (L.
In S Maine, green crab populations did not reach the low points observed in Eastern Maine and Canada (Welch 1968).
A first set of experiments compared the mortality rates of prey in the presence of the invasive green crab (Carcinus maenas) and the native rock crab (Cancer irroratus).